Showing posts with label VisualStudio. Show all posts
Showing posts with label VisualStudio. Show all posts

Wednesday, September 10, 2014

What's new in C# 6, VB 14? VS 14? Think "Developer Productivity versions"

Kathleen Dollard - Video Series on C# 6.0, Visual Basic 14 and Visual Studio 14

Video Series on C# 6.0, Visual Basic 14 and Visual Studio 14I am really excited to be sharing a series of short videos on C# 6.0, Visual Basic 14 and Visual Studio 14. The series will be free and available at www.WintellectNOW.com

The first video is “The New Compilers” and is an overview of the next releases.

The second video “Simplifying Classes with C# 6.0” shows how to use auto-property initialization, getter-only auto-properties and primary constructors to create classes with simple code and immutable or mutable properties.

Next week I’ll dive deeper into auto-properties and primary constructors in C#.

Visual Basic folks can watch these videos for the basic concepts in this release, and I’ll focus some upcoming videos on Visual Basic 14 features.

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BillWagner  - Overview of C# 6 language enhancements

I was interviewed by Carl and Richard on .NET Rocks a bit ago to discuss the new features in C# 6, the upcoming version of C# that will ship with the next version of Visual Studio (link goes to CTP 3, current as of Aug 2014). You can learn all about the new version of C# at the Roslyn CodePlex site.

The initial buzz about the next version of C# centered around the implications that this compiler was a complete rewrite, written in C# from the ground up. You’ve probably heard quite a bit about how you can use the Roslyn APIs to inspect and modify code models programmatically. That is super cool, and much easier than using the earlier CodeDOM and Reflection.Emit functionality. It’s also an edge case for most of us. I’ve written very little code that uses either CodeDOM or Reflection.Emit. And, while it is also very cool that the C# compiler is now self-hosted (meaning it is written in C#), that will have very minimal affect on you either.

So what is new?

...

image..."

C#6/VB 14 are shaping up to be "the" developer productivity version. The scary thing? This wheel has just started rolling and we're just starting to see the promise of Roslyn/.NET Compiler Platform. The next couple years are going to be very exciting in the .NET world.

Wednesday, September 03, 2014

Sando Code Search Tool gets revved up! (In more ways than one...)

David C. Shepherd - Searching the Linux Source Tree in 0.5 Seconds

Our recent work on the Sando Code Search extension, a tool which leverages Lucene to search code, has been focused on making it more scalable and robust. To demonstrate our progress I'll provide demos of both Sando and FindInFiles (i.e., a grep-like feature in Visual Studio) searching the entire Linux kernel. As you'll see, there's a fundamental difference between Lucene-based search tools and regular expression based search tools.

Before we begin, let's first briefly examine the Linux source tree. At the time of our demo it contained 47,528 files which occupied 1.71 GB on disk. Most of these files were C code, yet there was also a fair amount of documentation and configuration files. Sando and FindInFiles both search all text files.

Searching the Linux Source Tree with FindInFiles

To use FindInFiles I configured it to search the directory containing the Linux code, entered my search, and selected Find All. In this running example the user is searching for encryption algorithms, specifically those related to AES, and thus they use the regular expression query "encrypt*aes". Executing this search caused FindInFiles to run its regular expression matching algorithm against every line of every file in that directory, recursively. As you can see in "Starting the Search", this utilized about 50% of the CPU on an eight core machine for a considerable amount of time.

Starting the Search: Notice when the FindInFiles search begins the CPU utilization becomes 50% on a 8-core machine.

After about one minute and forty seconds the search completed, having searched 47,407 files. Unfortunately, no lines matched this particular search (see "Finishing the Search"). As often happens with a regular expression based search, the word ordering in the query did not match the word ordering in the code. In this situation the user would likely have to run another search with re-ordered search terms (e.g., "aes*encrypt") to find relevant code.

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Finishing the Search: After about 1m 40s the search completes; no results were found after searching 47,407 files.

Searching the Linux Source Tree with Sando

Next we searched the same Linux source tree using Sando. Unlike FindInFiles, which is based on regular expression matching, Sando is built upon information retrieval technology (think Google). It leverages Lucene.NET to pre-index source code and provide ranked results almost instantly. Typing in the same query as before minus the regular expression syntax (i.e., "encrypt aes") you can see below that results are returned almost instantly. Just as importantly, the most relevant results are returned first with less relevant results toward the bottom. Additionally, in Sando's UI, selecting a result in the list provides a preview of the program element with matching terms in bold.

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Searching with Lucene: The same search returns almost instantly when using Lucene-based searchers.

Of course, there is a cost to pre-indexing. For the Linux source tree that cost is about 50 minutes of low CPU background processing. Fortunately, this only happens once  after which incremental updates and switching branches trigger at most a few seconds of indexing. Additionally, for most medium-sized projects initial indexing completes in a matter of seconds. For instance, Sando can index its own source code in less than ten seconds.

..."

David reached out to me today with news about the updated Sando Code Search Tool/VS Extension and I just loved how he used VS and Sando to index and search the Linux source tree...

Also make sure you click through to the full post to not only see the pretty animated Gif's but to all see a number of other code search tools for VS and beyond. I dig that he took the time to highlight other similar tools.

Finally the source for this project is also still on CodePlex, https://sando.codeplex.com. :)

 

Related Past Post XRef:
Revisiting Sando - Full Text Index and Source your Source, while never leaving Visual Studio...
Code Searching with Sando, because "Code search sucks and Find & Replace is from the 80s..."

Monday, August 18, 2014

Bing Developer Assistant Beta for Visual Studio updated to include sample browser, offline support and more...

Bing Dev Center Team Blog - Bing Developer Assistant for Visual Studio focuses on improving productivity within the experience

Bing Developer Assistant for Visual Studio combines the functionality of two popular Visual Studio extensions into one: Sample Browser and Bing Code Search. This updated feature enables developers to find and reuse millions of code snippets and code sample projects from within the Visual Studio IDE.

The improved feature was developed after listening to customer feedback that a more efficient in-product search experience would allow them to not only find sample codes quickly while in Visual Studio, but would also have the capability to pull in relevant sample codes related to the developer projects themselves while coding, and include offline search. This collaboration across company and with our customers has helped us deliver all of these experiences within the New Bing Developer Assistant for Visual Studio!

What’s new with Bing Developer Assistant?

  • New Visual Studio IntelliSense experience to find code samples for API
  • Sample Browser one-stop shop
  • Offline search

Bing Developer Assistant delivers a major enhancement in Visual Studio IntelliSense. While coding, a relevant code snippet related to your current API will be automatically displayed in the IntelliSense window which is powered by Bing Code Search. Code snippets are short piece of code that you can easily learn and copy.

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...

The Sample Browser window is now your one-stop shop for code samples. By entering your programming needs on the Visual Studio toolbar, you will get both code snippets and code sample projects. Code sample projects are complete Visual Studio demo solutions that you can download, build and run. With the new Bing Developer Assistant for Visual Studio, a world of code samples are now at your fingertips

...

We have also added a 3rd feature heated requested by our users – Offline search. The new plugin enables you to search for code samples among your local or downloaded sample projects even when you are disconnected from the Internet....

...

What’s next?

We have an ambitious roadmap for Bing Developer Assistant for Visual Studio. As we mentioned earlier, there are plans to support more programming languages in the Visual Studio IntelliSense window. In addition, we are investigating expansion of the tool into other developer experiences within the company; enterprise code search, compile / debug error assistance, and MSDN forum support.

...

Google code search with Bing... :P

 

Related Past Post XRef:
Bing your IDE to this new C# Code Search VS Extension (from Bing)

Monday, August 11, 2014

Visual Studio Item, Project Templates? SideWaffle!

You all already follow my Microsoft Channel 9 posts, right? Like this morning's Coding4Fun Blog post, No waffling here... SideWaffle and a step-by-step guide to create Visual Studio Item Templates?

So I don't need to tell you just how cool I found SideWaffle to be? What, you might have missed it? Well then...!

SideWaffle 

Templates for Visual Studio 2012/2013

Download a delicious side dish for Visual Studio

SideWaffle is an extension

The SideWaffle extension adds a bunch of useful Snippets, Project- and Item Templates to Visual Studio. The purpose is to make your daily work in Visual Studio a richer and more productive experience.

Content
  • Project templates
    • Basic Scaffolder
    • Blank App
    • Browser Link Extension
    • Browser Link Extension (simple)
    • Caliburn.Micro WPF Application
    • Code Snippet Extension
    • Console Application Async
    • Durandal451
    • Google Chrome Extension
    • Google Chrome Theme
    • Google Chrome Web Store App
    • HTML5 Boiler Plate v4.3
    • Nancy demo
    • Nancy empty project with ASP.NET host
    • Nancy empty project with ASP.NET host and Razor
    • Nancy empty self hosted
    • Nancy empty self hosted with razor
    • Nancy with ASP.NET host
    • Nancy with ASP.NET host with Razor
    • Nancy with self host
    • Nancy with self host with Razor
    • Template from html5up.net
    • Windows Azure WebJobs Console Application
  • Item templates
    • _preprocess.xml
    • A basic NuGet .nuspec file
    • An advanced NuGet .nuspec file
    • AngularJs Controller using $scope
    • AngularJs Controller using 'Controller as'
    • AngularJs Directive
    • AngularJs Factory
    • AngularJs Module
    • AngularJs TypeScript Controller using $scope
    • AngularJs TypeScript Controller using 'Controller as'
    • AngularJs TypeScript Directive
    • AngularJs TypeScript Factory
    • AngularJs TypeScript Module
    • ASP.NET Scaffolding T4 files.
    • Basic build script
    • Basic props file
    • Basic SignalR Hub and HTML Client Page
    • Basic targets script
    • Browser Link extension (VS2013 only)
    • Build script with NuGet automatic package restore.
    • Caliburn Micro Bootstrapper
    • CKEditor plugin
    • Code Snippet
    • Customize ASP.NET T4 Files
    • DurandalJs Controller
    • DurandalJs main.js
    • DurandalJs Service
    • DurandalJs ViewModel
    • Editor Drop Handler class
    • Empty PowerShell file
    • Favicon .ico File
    • FirefoxOS manifest
    • GruntJS configuration file
    • HTML Smart Tag (VS2013 only)
    • HTML Validator Class (VS2013 only)
    • HTML Whitespace Removal HttpModule
    • Humans.txt File
    • Jasmine Spec and HTML files
    • Jasmine Spec file
    • JavaScript IIFE
    • JavaScript IIFE Module/Namespace
    • jQuery Plugin
    • JSHint Ignore File (.jshintignore)
    • JSHint Rules File (.jshintrc)
    • JSON Schema File
    • JSON Schema Selector Extension
    • Karma Configuration File
    • Knockout Custom Binding
    • Mocha Test Framework
    • Nancy bootstrapper
    • Nancy module
    • Ninject Controller Factory
    • NUnit Fixture
    • Offline Application Cache Manifest
    • Package Definition (.pkgdef)
    • Package.json for NodeJS
    • QUnit Spec and HTML files
    • QUnit Spec file
    • Readme.md File
    • Readme.md Markdown File
    • RequireJs File
    • Robots.txt File
    • SideWaffle Definitions Folder
    • SideWaffle Item Template
    • SideWaffle Project Template Files
    • SVG File
    • TinyMCE plugin
    • TSLint Rules File (tslint.json)
    • VS Command Table (.vsct)
    • Web API 2 Empty Controller
    • WebVTT File
    • Windows Azure Blob Upload Helper
    • Windows Azure Cloud Service Plugin
    • Windows Azure Table Storage Entity
  • Snippets
    • Angular Controller
    • Angular Directive
    • Angular Service
    • Cross Browser Background Linear Gradient
    • Cross Browser Background Radial Gradient
    • Dispose
    • Nancy - Delete
    • Nancy - Get
    • Nancy - Head
    • Nancy - Options
    • Nancy - Patch
    • Nancy - Post
    • Nancy - Put
    • WCF Client Usage
Open Source

SideWaffle is open source and everyone is invited to contribute. The code is on GitHub.

The entire project is 100% community driven.

See what I mean? How cool is that!

And make sure you don't miss Richard Kerslake's post, A step by step guide to developing Visual Studio item templates using SideWaffle

 

Places you can find me on Channel 9;

Remember SketchFlow? It's still around and still a cool prototyping tool...

Illuminate - Blend for Visual Studio 2013 Prototyping Applications with SketchFlow

SketchFlow enables rapid creating of dynamic interface mockups very quickly. The SketchFlow workspace is the same as the standard Blend workspace with the inclusion of three panels: the SketchFlow Feedback panel, the SketchFlow Animation panel and the SketchFlow Map panel.

By using SketchFlow to prototype, you can get feedback early in the process. It helps to surface possible issues, lower development iterations, and increase stakeholder buy in. SketchFlow prototypes not only provide an initial look but also provide a way to add additional ideas and input and make sure the team is on track prior to investing in complete development.

When you have completed the prototyping, you can discard the prototype and just use the lessons learned to design the application from or extract individual elements from your prototype and include them in the application. I don’t recommend trying to transition the entire project into a development project.

Objects that you add with the SketchFlow style have a hand-sketched look. The sketch style is used to remind stakeholders that this is a prototype. This encourages them to focus on the flow and functionality without getting distracted by design details.

image..."

While I use PowerPoint Storyboards for most of my design/visual prototyping (yes, even though I didn't "get why" for the longest time... now you can take my PPSB from my cold de... ;), there's still much to be said for a prototyping solution you can "ship" to your users, one that they can play with an really see how stuff might really work, annotate it, etc.

You all know how it is. Users really need something to click on, something to run to really get what an app is going to do. Storyboards are great, but like I said... you know how it is. Clicking is the road to understanding.

If this is your world, SketchFlow might be something you should take another close look at, heck it's free (if you have VS Ultimate or Premium at least...)

 

Related Past Post XRef:
Blend for VS2013 Windows Phone SketchFlow Templates
For the Win[JS] - Blend for Visual Studio 2012 now available (and Blend for WPF/SilverLight & SketchFlow Preview too)
Will the real Windows Phone 7 SketchFlow Template please stand up...
Sketching out an WP7 user interface and interaction with SketchFlow
A SketchFlow Two-fer day - “Shawn Wildermuth on SketchFlow/dnrTV” and “Prototyping a WPF-3D game design workflow using TrueSpace 3D, Expression Blend 3 with SketchFlow, and exporting the prototype to XNA Game Studio.”
“Application Prototyping with SketchFlow” Refcardz
Four Expression 3 Starter Kits, two for Blend and two for Web, focusing on Sketchflow, Gaming, SuperPreview and SilverLight.

Tuesday, July 29, 2014

Bringing some Unity to Visual Studio - "Visual Studio Tools for Unity 1.9" now available for free for VS 2010/12/13

The Visual Studio Blog - Visual Studio Tools for Unity 1.9

Today we released the Visual Studio Tools for Unity add-on (formerly known as UnityVS). It is now available for download on the Visual Studio Gallery at the following links:

VSTU is Microsoft’s free Visual Studio add-on that enables a rich programming and debugging experience for working with the Unity gaming tools and platform. This is our first release since the acquisition of SyntaxTree, and we’re excited to have the opportunity to reach to the Unity community with Visual Studio.

image

Here are the highlights in today’s 1.9 release:

  • Faster debugger. Attaching and detaching the debugger as well as expanding local variables is now faster.
  • Faster startup. Opening VSTU projects is now faster.
  • Better handling of C# constructs. The local variables window is now properly populated when debugging iterators or when variables are accessed inside closures.
  • Start your game and your debugging session in one click. This feature is one of our most-requested: you can now attach the debugger and start the game by simply changing the debug target. This is only available in Visual Studio 2012 and 2013.

And many more new features and bug fixes as you can see in our changelog. ...

If you're doing Unity dev, this free tool looks like an important to have one.

Funny, before Build I WAG'd that Microsoft would buy Unity. Guess I was sort of right... kind of... :P

Thursday, July 10, 2014

The WebBrowser in VS making you crazy with its IE7 emulation mode? Here's how you can IE 8/9/10/11 it and more... (Think "WebBrowser Control Emulation Mode" post of the day)

Robert MacLean - Improve the embedded browser in Visual Studio

Visual Studio has an embedded browser, but it uses the IE 7 render path?! Really, that is pretty messed up.

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Thankfully, you can fix this yourself with a quick registry addition. Note: Fiddling with the registry can break your device, so be careful and this carries the usual “this works on my machine” and it is your own risk for doing this. The key you need to care about is:

... [Click through to see the reg hack... I didn't want to steal his secret sauce... ;]

I set the value to (HEX) 2af9 – since I have IE 11 on my Windows 8.1 machine, but you can pick from the list of options to best suit your needs and now it just works! No issues on GitHub

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Internet Explorer Dev Center - Internet Feature Controls (B..C)

...

Browser Emulation

Windows Internet Explorer 8 and later. The FEATURE_BROWSER_EMULATION feature defines the default emulation mode for Internet Explorer and supports the following values.

image

...

I know you're thinking, "VS just embed's the WebBrowser control, which I like to do to, sometimes. Can I make this magic happen for me too?" Or "I'd like a little more detail and depth!"

Funny you should ask that...

Cyotek Blog - Configuring the emulation mode of an Internet Explorer WebBrowser control

Occasionally I need to embed HTML in my applications. If it is just to display some simple layout with basic interactions, I might use a component such as HtmlRenderer. In most cases however, I need a more complex layout, JavaScript or I might want to display real pages from the internet - in which case I'm lumbered with the WebBrowser control.

I'm aware other embeddable browsers exist, but the idea of shipping additional multi-MB dependencies doesn't make sense unless an application makes heavy use of HTML interfaces

The WebBrowser control annoys me in myriad ways, but it does get the job done. One of the things that occasionally frustrates me is that by default it is essentially an embedded version of Internet Explorer 7 - or enabling Compatibility Mode in a modern IE session. Not so good as more and more sites use HTML5 and other goodies.

Rather fortunately however, Microsoft provide the ability to configure the emulation mode your application will use. It's not as simple as setting some properties on a control as it involves setting some registry values and other caveats, but it is still a reasonable process.

...

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There you go! Just about everything you've every wanted to know about this (or not)

A community created GuidGen, GuidGen 2.0 (a replacement for Guid tool you love to hate, hate to love)

Visual Studio Gallery - GuidGen 2.0

Provides a new Create GUID command in the Tools menu with a new WPF surface, and featuring code tailored for C# and VB.NET developers to define Guid fields. Also provides editor inline code completions for adding GUIDs, guid fields and guid attributes for C# and VB.NET!

Let's face it. The Create Guid (guidgen.exe) tool that ships with VS is over a decade old and is old Win32 GDI based. It also doesn't produce any code snippets useful for C#/VB developers.

GuidGen 2.0 is a new face to creating GUIDs. And includes C#/VB code snippets!

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But a separate app to copy GUIDs from into the editor is still old school. Why not have inline editor completions for GUIDs? Just type "guid" in your C# or VB code files, then click on "Guids" or press Alt+. to select the Guids tab with the keyboard.

image

..."

A new face for the tool I'm sure we've all used at one time or another (or not...)

I love the addition of the code snips. :)

 

Related Past Post XRef:
Visual Studio Add-In of the Day - Inline Guid Generator

Tuesday, July 08, 2014

Visual Studio "14" CTP 2 is now available. There's many more CTP's coming, ALL CAPS are not, no TFS "14" CTP's, don't side-by-side this CTP and more...

Brian Harry has the quote of the day for this release...

Brian Harry’s blog - Visual Studio “14” CTP 2 Available

I’m not going to make too big a deal about this because there’s going to be tons of them between now and when VS “14” ships.  But we shipped another CTP today and you can learn more about it here: http://blogs.msdn.com/b/visualstudio/archive/2014/07/08/visual-studio-14-ctp-2-available.aspx

We’re continuing the practice of making Azure VM templates available to make it really easy to try out the CTPs....

...

For reasons I explained in my last post on the subject, we are not releasing TFS “14” CTPs at this time and, quite honestly, won’t for a while.  We will start releasing CTPs of TFS well before the release but there’s just not a good enough cost benefit analysis to it right now.  You can see the majority of the work we are doing on VS Online as we do it.

The Visual Studio Blog - Visual Studio “14” CTP 2 Available

Today we released CTP 2 of Visual Studio “14”, which is the codename for the next version of Visual Studio. To get started, you can download the bits (also available on MSDN subscriber downloads), or use the VM in Azure we’re making available (see the note below). In addition to the new features we added in CTP 1, this CTP also includes:

  • Save and Apply Custom IDE Layouts. You can now save and apply custom layouts for tool windows in the IDE. The Save Window Layout and Apply Window Layout commands are under the Window Menu and you can also rename, reorder, and delete layouts from Manage Window Layouts.
  • Light Bulb Editor Adornment. Light Bulbs are an extensible editor adornment to identify and help you fix issues in your code. To use them, place the caret on a line with an issue or hover over an issue and you’ll see a light bulb that lists actions you can take to resolve the problem and even a preview of proposed solutions.
  • Editor Touch Support. The Visual Studio Editor now supports touch gestures for scrolling, pinch-to-zoom, tap-and-hold for context menus, double-tap for word selection, and line selection by tapping in the margin.
  • VC++ Property Pages and Editor Enhancements. We updated the Configuration and Platform dropdown values for VC++ Property Page dialog to remember the last user selection when the dialog is closed. We also added Move Function Definition (move the body of a function definition to source or header/in-class definition) and Implement Pure Virtuals (quickly create definitions for a class that inherits constructs ([abstract] class, struct, etc.) containing pure virtuals). We also updated Create Declaration/Definition to include Code Peek and improved Find in Files to enable subsequent results to be appended to previous results ("append mode"). Checkout the VC Blog for details on these enhancements.
  • ALL CAPS. Last week with the RC for Visual Studio 2013 Update 3 we added an option to sentence case menus; in this VS “14” CTP we changed Menu Bar styling to Title Case for everyone to help us get feedback on the change. We’ll use the feedback we get to help determine if we keep it as it is in this preview, make it an option under the Tools/Options menu, or take some other path.

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Visual Studio "14" CTP release notes

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Notes:

  • CTPs are English only.
  • CTPs are unsupported and are intended to be used for testing, trial, and feedback purposes only.
  • CTPs have not been subject to final validation. They are not meant to be run on production workstations or servers, or used to create production code. Installing a CTP on a production server will put the server in an unsupported state.
  • Although these CTPs are intended to be installed side-by-side with earlier versions of Visual Studio, complete compatibility on every CTP is not guaranteed.

...

    Visual Studio "14" CTP 2 (version 14.0.21901.1.DP) details
    Technology improvements

    The following technology improvements have been made in this release.
    ASP.NET and web development

    • ASP.NET vNext: This release of Visual Studio supports creating and developing ASP.NET vNext applications. ASP.NET vNext is a lean and composable .NET stack for building modern web applications for both cloud and on-premises servers. It includes the following features:
      • ASP.NET MVC and Web API have been unified into a single programming model.
      • A no-compile developer experience.
      • Environment-based configuration for a seamless transition to the cloud.
      • Dependency injection out-of-the-box.
      • New cloud-optimized runtime supports true side-by-side versioning. 
      • NuGet everything, even the runtime itself.
      • Run in IIS, or self-hosted in your own process.
      • All open source through the .NET Foundation

        (http://www.dotnetfoundation.org/)

        , and takes contributions.

      For more information about ASP.NET vNext in Visual Studio, go to the ASP.NET vNext

      (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=400692)

      website.

    • This release of Visual Studio also includes all the current ASP.NET and web development features that are released as parts of Visual Studio 2013 Update 2. Learn more here

      (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=400693)

      .

    Visual C++

    • Find in Files has been updated to enable subsequent results to be added to previous results ("append mode"). Results can now also be edited or deleted.
    • Implement Pure Virtuals enables a user to quickly create definitions for a class that inherits constructs (such as abstract class, struct) containing pure virtuals. Both multiple and recursive inheritances are supported. Activate the feature through right-clicking a class definition (implement all pure virtuals) or an inherited base construct (implement pure virtuals in that base only). Double-slash comments (//) are used to delimit groups of functions implemented from individual bases.
    • Move Function Definition enables a user to move the body of a function definition to source or header/in-class definition. It must be activated through the right-click context menu on a function's signature.

    Visual Studio IDE

    • Menu Bars will show in Title Case style instead of All Caps style.
    • Support for touch in the Visual Studio Editor is now available. This includes touch for scrolling, pinch-to-zoom, tap-and-hold for context menus, double-tap for word selection, and line selection by tapping in the margin. 
    • The Configuration and Platform dropdown values for the VC Property Page dialog have been changed to remember the last user selection when closed and reopened. 
    • Users can save custom layouts by clicking Save Window Layout from the Window menu. Users can apply a custom layout by clicking Apply Window Layout from the Window menu, and users can delete, rename, or reorder layouts by clicking Manage Window Layout from the Window menu. The first nine layouts also have keyboard shortcuts from Ctrl+Alt+1 to Ctrl+Alt+9.
    • In this CTP, we are rounding out Light Bulbs that are the quick and easy way to obtain helpful fixes for known issues in your code inside the Visual Studio Editor. If you have an issue in your code, placing your editor caret on the line where the issue is shown or hovering over the issue will present a light bulb that shows helpful actions you can take to resolve the problem together with a preview of the results of each action. 
      This feature is publicly extensible, so Visual Studio extenders can provide their own suggested actions.
    • After you apply this CTP, you can create an empty C# and JavaScript shared project from the File > New Project menu. Phone Projects, Store Projects, and Universal Projects that are written in JavaScript and C# can consume one or many of these shared projects. Shared project references can be managed (added or removed) by using the Reference Manager. Shared Project referencing is also available for some classic desktop C# projects. The project types and languages that support Shared Projects will continue to expand in future CTPs.
    • In this CTP, Visual Studio now supports high-resolution icons in the Error List.
    Known issues
    Installation
    Installing Visual Studio "14" CTP side-by-side with Visual Studio 2013
    • There are known issues when you install Visual Studio "14" CTP 14.0.21901.1 DP on the same computer as Visual Studio 2013. While we expect that an uninstallation of Visual Studio "14" and then a repair of Visual Studio 2013 should fix these issues, our safest recommendation is to install Visual Studio "14" in a virtual machine, a virtual hard disk (VHD), a fresh computer, or another non-production test-only computer that does not have Visual Studio 2013 on it. These Visual Studio side-by-side issues are expected to be fixed soon.

    Client Platform

    • Uninstalling Visual Studio "14" CTP removes TypeScript from Visual Studio 2013.

    Upgrading

    • Because of a known issue, when you install Visual Studio "14" CTP 14.0.21901.1 DP on the same computer that has Visual Studio "14" CTP 14.0.21730.1 DP installed, your Windows Store projects may fail to launch. 
      To work around this issue, repair the installation of Visual Studio "14" CTP 14.0.21901.1 DP after the upgrade. To avoid this issue, our safest recommendation is to uninstall Visual Studio "14" CTP 14.0.21730.1 DP before you install the new CTP version. This build-to-build upgrade issue has been fixed for future upgrades from Visual Studio "14" 14.0.21901.1 DP.

    Visual C++

    • The native "Memory Usage" tool does not work when targeting Win32 (x86).  Targeting x64 works as expected.

    ...

    In short, it's a CTP. Don't install it on a production box. Use the Azure VM!

    Thursday, June 26, 2014

    Being open to opening OpenXML documents in Visual Studio with the now open source Open XML Package Editor for VS 2012/2013

    OpenXML Developer - Open XML Package Editor Released for VS2012 and VS2013

    image

    Chris Rae recently announced on his blog that we have released a new version of the Open XML Package Editor, which now works on Visual Studio 2012 and 2013!

    As anyone knows who has seen any of my screen-casts, the Open XML Package Editor is my go-to tool for opening and editing Open XML documents. It is a vital tool for Open XML Developers. After installing, you can drag and drop Open XML documents onto Visual Studio, navigate through the various parts, open parts for editing in the very excellent XML editor that is in Visual Studio, and modify any relationship in the package. Unfortunately, until this release, you had to keep a copy of Visual Studio 2010 around in order to use the tool, a pain to say the least. Well, no more. Now it works with the latest versions of Visual Studio, and furthermore, we will never get into the situation again where it only works for previous versions of Visual Studio. Since it is open source, you, I, or anyone else can quickly do the port to new versions of VS. It now supports Visio's new VSDX format and has some other minor fixes and enhancements.

    We have published the code on GitHub under the Apache 2.0 license. If you just want to download the new version of the Package Editor, it's here on the Visual Studio Gallery. [GD: Post Leached in Full]

    We all know that OpenXML documents (DocX, XlxX, PptX, *X, etc, etc) are really just zip file containers with standardize manifests, contents and packaging right? (Don't believe me? Rename a .DocX to .zip and see).
    And sure, you can open and spelunk the unzipped contents of the document, it's not the easiest. Instead you've got to use an OpenXML explorer, one like this one, the Open XML Package Editor. And hey you can even stay in your favorite tool of choice (Visual Studio of course!). And now that it's open source, it's even cooler!

     

    Related Past Post XRef:
    Open Sesame - Open XML SDK is now open source

    Using OpenXML SDK to generate Word documents via templates (and without Word being installed)
    Checking for Microsoft Word DocX/DocM Revisions/Track Changes without using Word... (via OpenXML SDK, LINQ to XML or XML DOM)
    LINQ to XlsX... Using VB.Net, LINQ, the OpenXML SDK and a little C# helper, to query an Excel XlsX
    Using native OpenXML to create an XlsX (Which provides an example of why I highlight tools that make OpenXML easier...)
    Generating Xlsx's on the Server? You're using OpenXML, right? With help from the PowerTools for OpenXML?

    Official boat-load, as in supertanker, sized OpenXML content list (Insert "One OpenXML content list to rule them all" here)
    So how do I get from here to OpenXML? Got a map for you, an Open XML SDK Blog Map…
    Where to go to scratch your OpenXML dev info itch…
    "Open XML Explained" Free eBook (PDF)
    The Noob's Guide to Open XML Dev (If you know how to spell OpenXML but that's about it, this is your Getting Started guide...)

    Reusing the PowerShell PowerTools for Open XML in your C# or VB.Net world
    PowerShell, OpenXML, WMI and the PowerTools for OpenXML = Doc generation for our inner geek
    Because it’s a PowerShell kind of day… PowerTools for Open XML V1.1 Released
    OpenXML PowerTools updated – Cell your Excel via PowerShell
    Powering into OpenXML with PowerShell

    Open XML SDK 2.0 for Microsoft Office Released – Automate Office documents without Office

    Open XML 2.0 Code Snippets for VS2010 (and VS2008 too)
    Open XML Format SDK 2.0 Code Snippets for Visual Studio 2008 – 52 C#/VB Code Snippets to help ease your Open XML coding
    Open XML File Format Code Snippets for Visual Studio 2005 (Office 2007 NOT required)

    Open XML SDK v1 Released

    OpenXML Viewer 1.0 Released – Open source DocX to HTML conversion, with IE, Firefox and Opera (and/or command line) support

    Monday, June 23, 2014

    Using Web Essentials 2013? Just say Yes (to the update) - Update it before you apply VS 2013.3...

    Mads Kristensen - Important update to Web Essentials 2013

    You need to update Web Essentials 2013 to version 2.2. If not, Visual Studio will crash. Download now.

    Before Visual Studio 2013 Update 3

    The upcoming release of Visual Studio Update 3 has API changes in some of the components that Web Essentials is extending. Those changes are not compatible with the current version of Web Essentials and will cause VS to crash after upgrading to Update 3. To be fair, those APIs were never public to begin with, so I was taking a chance when I was using them in Web Essentials.

    If you are currently using Web Essentials 2.1 for Visual Studio Update 2, you should see this dialog show up the next time you open Visual Studio.

    image

    This is the first time this notification feature has been used after introducing it in Web Essentials 2.1. Good thing we did.

    It’s important that you install this update immediately. You don’t have to restart Visual Studio – it’s enough that you just install the update. If not, you might forget to do it before you install Visual Studio Update 3. So go do it now.

    It turns out to be good timing... [Read the rest, including a list of the new features in the Web Essentials 2013.2 update!]

    If you're on VS 2013 and using Web Essentials, as I said in the title, just say Yes...

    From Studio to Studio - Apps made in App Studio, opened in Visual Studio

    Pluralsight blog - Taking Windows Phone apps from App Studio to Visual Studio

    Microsoft’s App Studio just got a whole lot more powerful. In the latest version, you can make universal apps that run on Windows Phone 8.1 and Windows 8.1, as well as Windows Phone 8 apps – you can also include maps, music and RSS feeds. Even better, you can speed up the whole process by getting started in App Studio and then opening your code in Visual Studio.

    ...

    You can also create your entire app right in App Studio. This includes making the manifest by adding details in the Publisher info section; you’ll need to create a privacy statement and include the publisher information for your developer account if you want it published to the official Store. It should also be noted that you’ll have to create screenshots separately, since you can’t do this in App Studio (you can either run it on your device or load it in Visual Studio and grab screenshots from the emulator).

    Opening apps in Visual Studio

    If you want to add social connections, tweak the Windows tile, create a multilingual app or include advertising, you’ll need to open your app in Visual Studio. To do this, make sure you have Visual Studio and the latest version of the Windows Phone SDK installed (download here). Choose “Finish” on the App Studio site, then “Generate.” Along with the installable download package and the Publish package, this also generates a source code package. If you created an app in the first version of App Studio, it’s worth going back and getting the source code again; the new release creates much cleaner, higher quality code using the MVVM pattern.

    ...

    image

    AppStudio can make Windows Phone 8 apps or universal phone and Windows apps.

    Remember, you can choose Windows Phone 8 or universal apps here; they need Windows Phone 8.1 so if you don’t have the developer preview on your phone, you won’t be able to sideload them. If you want, you can generate the Windows Phone 8 app, then click the Generate button again to get the universal code. (You’ll need to change the App.zip file name if you download both, but you’ll probably want to do that anyway.)

    If you don’t want to go through the steps of starting your app on App Studio, you can also download the source code for the two sample apps on the site. This gives you an outline MVVM app you can use to get started, with placeholders that can be changed.

    When you open your project, Visual Studio should automatically load the packages from NuGet that App Studio uses, ...

    ...

    To localize an app with multiple languages, open the AppResources.resx file in the Resources folder of your project source code. On the project’s Properties page in the Supported Culture box, select whichever languages you want to use for the UI.

    Visual Studio will create a new resource file for each supported language that is a duplicate of the AppResources.resx default language resource file, renamed using the locale code, such as AppResources.de-DE.resx for German and Germany or AppResources.de-AT.resx for German and Austria. Edit each language file to put in the correct UI strings. Now, when you build, your app should be multi-lingual.

    The new version of App Studio makes more powerful apps than the original, but they’re still basic. Opening the code in Visual Studio means you can get started with an app quickly, including adding resources like tiles and icons. In a nutshell, the new App Studio lets you get cracking on the interesting code more quickly.

    ... [Click through to read the entire post, see all the pictures and support the author :]

    I dig that you can kind of scaffold the app in App Studio and then apply your personal tweaks in VS. The power dev's can make their App Studio App's stand out from the rest... :)

    Wednesday, June 11, 2014

    VS 2012, VS 2013 and .NET Framework Doc's for offline installs (i.e. an ISO)

    Microsoft Downloads - Microsoft Visual Studio and .NET Framework Documentation (ISO image)

    This download includes an ISO image file of the Visual Studio and .NET Framework documentation—overviews, how-to articles, API reference pages, sample code, and more—to help you in your development efforts

    Date Published: 6/10/2014

    VS2012Documentation.iso, 2.7 GB

    VS2013Documentation.iso, 4.0 GB

    Visual Studio is a family of products, tools, and technologies that you can use to build powerful, high-performance apps, including Windows Store, desktop, web, phone, and game-console apps. You can write code in Visual Basic, Visual C#, Visual C++, Visual F#, and JavaScript, and create mixed-language solutions. And you can simplify the development of your apps by using the .NET Framework.

    This download includes an ISO image file of the Visual Studio and .NET Framework documentation—overviews, how-to articles, API reference pages, sample code, and more—to help you in your development efforts. It includes multiple ISO files for different versions of the Visual Studio and .NET Framework documentation. When you choose the Download button, you’ll be prompted to select one of these files (see Quick Details for a list).

    After you download the ISO image file, you can record, or "burn," the image to a recordable DVD for later installation or redistribution. You can also open the ISO image file and copy its contents to a local folder, or you can mount and access the ISO image file as a virtual device.
    The Visual Studio and .NET Framework documentation is provided in the following formats:

    • Online, in the MSDN Library (this is the most up-to-date content):
    • Offline, through downloadable books (available from the Visual Studio Help menu).
    • (This download) As a DVD5 ISO image file, which is a copy of a DVD that includes the documentation. The image file is provided for users who want to create an installation DVD (for example, administrators who want to install the documentation on multiple computers offline). If you want to download the documentation for local use on a single computer, choose the online or offline option above.

    Note: This DVD5 ISO image file doesn’t include updates to the documentation that were made after product release. See the online documentation for the latest information.

    If you have a network or environment that isn't connected to the internet (yep, day job has one...) and you need VS/.NET Doc's this is an ISO you'll need.

    It reminds me of the MSDN Library DVD days (which I think I still have a number of...lol)

    Tuesday, June 03, 2014

    Visual Studio "14" CTP 1 Now Available

    Somasegar’s blog - Visual Studio "14" CTP

    Today, we are making available a first community technology preview of the next version of Visual Studio, codenamed Visual Studio “14”.  This early build is focused on enabling feedback and testing from the Visual Studio community.  Visual Studio "14" will most likely be available sometime in 2015, with a more complete preview release and final naming available later this year.  Given that this is a very early build, please install in a test environment with no earlier versions of Visual Studio installed.

    You can read about the new features and known issues in this first Visual Studio “14” CTP, and also download today.

    Over the last 3 months, we've announced many exciting technologies that will be important parts of Visual Studio "14" - including the "Roslyn" .NET compiler platform, ASP.NET vNext and Apache Cordova tooling.  The Visual Studio "14" CTP 1 includes these tools, as well as many additional improvements across Visual Studio, including an early look at some new C++ 11 support that will be part of Visual Studio "14".

    C# and VB with the .NET Compiler Platform ("Roslyn")

    In Visual Studio "14", the C# and VB compilers and IDE support are fully built on the .NET Compiler Platform ("Roslyn").  This open-source compiler as a service now sits behind dozens of developer experiences in Visual Studio "14", powering build, IntelliSense, refactoring, CodeLens, debugging and many more features developers use every day.  In most places the experiences are unchanged, but there have also been many small improvements across the entire development experience as part of the new compiler platform.

    In the Visual Studio "14" preview C# refactoring support has been completely revamped including two new core refactorings: Inline Temporary Variable and Introduce Explaining Variable. Additionally, refactoring support for Visual Basic has been added for the first time.

    image

    Visual Studio "14" also supports APIs that come from NuGet with their own analyzers, squiggling issues in your code as you type and offering you automatic fixes, all powered by the .NET Compiler Platform.

    You can read more about the new C# and VB developer experiences on the C# blog and the Visual Basic blog.

    ASP.NET vNext

    ...

    You can read more about ASP.NET vNext in the Visual Studio "14" CTP on the .NET Web Development and Tools blog.

    C++ 11/14

    We've continued to push forward on the standards conformance of the Visual C++ compiler....

    ...

    You can read more about the C++ improvements in the Visual Studio "14" CTP on the C++ blog.

    Summary

    This early preview of Visual Studio "14" is an opportunity to gather feedback on the next version of Visual Studio and .NET.  For developers picking up the CTP, I encourage you to share your feedback on the Connect website, or through Send-a-Smile in the Visual Studio IDE.

    Visual Studio "14" CTP release notes

    Visual Studio "14" CTP Version 14.0.21730.1.DP release notes

    This article lists the release notes for the Microsoft Visual Studio "14" Community Technology Previews (CTPs).

    Visual Studio "14" CTPs are previews for the next major release of Visual Studio. These Visual Studio CTPs are intended to promote continuous feedback between early adopters and the Visual Studio development team. We would love to receive your input on the new product functionality and the improved experiences. Your feedback will help shape the future of Visual Studio, and together we will improve the developer experience.

    The following download link will always point you to the latest CTP:
    Download the latest Visual Studio "14" CTP package now

    Notes:

    • CTPs are English only.
    • CTPs are unsupported and are intended to be used for testing, trial, and feedback purposes only.
    • CTPs have not been subject to final validation. They are not meant to be run on production workstations or servers, or used to create production code. Installing a CTP on a production server will put the server in an unsupported state.
    • Although these CTPs are intended to be installed side-by-side with earlier versions of Visual Studio, complete compatibility on every CTP is not guaranteed. For this early Visual Studio "14" CTP, we recommend that you install the product in a VM, a VHD, or on a fresh computer, because there are known side-by-side compatibility issues with Visual Studio 2013.
    Feedback

    The goal of this CTP is to collect your feedback. To report a bug, please use Connect. You can also share your ideas and suggestions on UserVoice. Your quick thoughts can be shared by using Send-a-Smile through the Visual Studio IDE.

    New Features

    image

     

    Known issues

    ...

    Installing Visual Studio "14" CTP side-by-side with Visual Studio 2013

    There are known issues when you install Visual Studio "14" CTP 14.0.21730.1 DP on the same computer as Visual Studio 2013. While we expect that an uninstallation of Visual Studio "14" and then a repair of Visual Studio 2013 should fix these issues, our safest recommendation is to install Visual Studio "14" in a VM, a VHD, a fresh computer, or another non-production test-only computer that does not have Visual Studio 2013 on it. All of these Visual Studio side-by-side issues are expected to be fixed soon.

    There is an installation block in this Visual Studio "14" CTP that will prevent installation on a computer where an earlier version of Visual Studio is already installed. To disable the block that will put the computer in an un-recommended state, add the value "BlockerOverride" to the registry:

    HKLM\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\DevDiv\vs\Servicing

    Note the Known Issues! But Yeah! New VS!  :)

    Monday, June 02, 2014

    Ook! The Visual Studio 2013 SDK Sample (and more)

    I'm sure you saw my Coding4Fun Blog post today? The one where I highlight the just released Visual Studio 2013 SDK samples? Oh wait, grrrr... maybe you didn't since just found out I screwed up the schedule for it (7/2, 6/2, so close yet so far apart) doh! Well it's live now at least! :/ Anyway, for details on the entire newly released Visual Studio 2013 SDK samples, check out Visual Studio 2013 SDK Samples Released

    Of the samples, this is one that makes me smile, as I dig Ook!

    Ook Language sample - VS 2013

    This is the example used during the Visual Studio Ecosystem Summit Presentation "Getting Linguistic: Integrating a Language into Visual Studio" by Chris Granger. It implements the following language features for the esoteric language "Ook!":

    • General purpose token tagger
    • A classification tagger
    • A QuickInfo source and controller
    • A completion source and controller

    Requirements

    ...

    Grab it and get Ooking!

     

    Related Past Post XRef:
    Visual Studio 2010 SDK Samples - One 30MB download, 68 samples, tons of learning...
    Programming Languages You May have Missed. Zombie, Ook!, Chef and more

    Friday, May 23, 2014

    Visual Studio Productivity Power Tools 2013 adds "syntactic line compression" (think "Lossless 25% more visible lines for free")

    The Visual Studio Blog - Announcing Update to Productivity Power Tools 2013

    Today, we’re releasing an update to Productivity Power Tools 2013 on the Visual Studio Gallery. In this release, we fixed a number of customer-reported bugs and issues, and introduced a new feature called syntactic line compression.

    Syntactic line compression enables you to make better use of your screen’s vertical real-estate. It shrinks lines that contain neither letters nor numbers by 25% vertically, allowing more lines to be displayed in the editor. Other lines are not affected.

    Here’s an illustration of the same code before and after the feature is applied. You can see the extra lines you can get in the same space with no loss of content:

    image

    As with all Productivity Power Tools features, if you don’t like it you can turn it on and off in Tools…Options…Editor…

    Now that's an interesting feature. We keep the whitespace yet also reclaim a little of our vertical screen space. Nice!

    Thursday, May 22, 2014

    The updates just keep a rolling...Visual Studio 2013.3 CTP 1 Released

    Microsoft Downloads - This is a Community Technology Preview (CTP) for Visual Studio 2013 Update 3

    Version: 2013

    Date Published: 5/20/2014

    File Name:

    rm_Client.exe
    rm_DeploymentTrial90.exe
    rm_Server.exe
    rtools_setup_arm.exe
    rtools_setup_x64.exe
    rtools_setup_x86.exe
    tfs_express.exe
    tfs_server.exe
    VS2013.3 CTP.exe
    vs2013.3.ctp1_rm_enu.iso
    vs2013.3.ctp1_tfs_enu.iso
    vs2013.3.ctp1_tfs_exp_enu.iso

    By releasing periodic updates, we can enhance and expand Visual Studio to support the latest software development innovations for building and managing modern apps. For more information, see Visual Studio Updates and the Visual Studio Update KB Article.

    PLEASE NOTE: This Community Technology Preview has not been subject to final validation and is not meant to be run on production workstations or servers.

    For the Visual Studio update package: The recommended approach for upgrading Visual Studio on test workstations is installing the latest Visual Studio Update CTP on top of an RTM release or a previous CTP build of that Update. Visual Studio CTPs can be upgraded to a different build.

    For full-upgrade packages (ex: Team Foundation Server, Release Management, Remote Tools): Do not install an Update CTP on a production server, as it will put the server in an unsupported state. Unlike with Visual Studio CTPs, installing a full-upgrade package CTP completely replaces the current release on the server with the CTP. Full-upgrade package CTPs cannot be upgraded to future CTPs or releases nor “downgraded” to a previous release.

    ...

    Description of Visual Studio 2013 Update 3 CTP 1

    Microsoft released Visual Studio 2013 Update 3 Community Technology Preview 1 (CTP 1) on May 22, 2014. Visual Studio 2013 Update 3 CTP 1 includes the latest software updates, feature additions, and bug fixes.

    ...

    Important This update applies to Visual Studio and Team Foundation Server (TFS). Visual Studio and TFS installation mechanics are different. The Visual Studio update is an update that installs on top of whatever is already installed on the computer. The TFS update is a full layout that replaces whatever is installed on the computer. Before you try to apply the TFS update, make sure that you have a full backup of your current databases. If the TFS update installation fails, you cannot restart the update or roll back to the earlier version of TFS without performing a restore.

    ...

    Technology improvements

    The following technology improvements were made in this release.

    Debugger

    • If you have more than one monitor, Visual Studio will remember which monitor a Windows Store application was last run on.
    • You can debug x86 applications that are built by .NET native.
    • When you analyze managed memory dump files, you can go to Definition and Find All References of the selected type.

    IntelliTrace

    • You can skip straight to the details of performance events that are exported from Application Insights to IntelliTrace.

    Profiler

    • The Performance and Diagnostics hub can open profiling sessions (.diagsession files) that were exported from the F12 tools in the latest developer preview of Internet Explorer 11.

    Release Management

    • You can use Windows PowerShell or the Windows PowerShell Desired State Configuration (DSC) feature to deploy and manage configuration data. Additionally, you can deploy to the following environments without having to set up Microsoft Deployment Agent:
      • Windows Azure environments
      • On-premise environments (Standard environments)

    Testing Tools

    • You can add custom fields and custom work flows for test plans and test suites.
    • You can use Manage Test Suites permission for granting access to test suites.
    • You can track changes to test plans and test suites by using work item history.

    Visual Studio IDE

    • CodeLens authors and changes indicators are now available for Git repositories.
    • In Code Map, links are styled by using colors, and they display in the improved Legend.
    • Debugger Map automatically zooms to the call stack entry of interest and preserves user's zoom preferences.
    • You can drag binaries from the Windows file explorer to a code map, and then start exploring binaries by using Code Map.
    Known issues

    ...

    Currently looking like a roll-up/catch-up/bug fix version...

    Tuesday, May 20, 2014

    Now that's classic, Visual Basic [Classic] Tools for Visual Studio

    Visual Studio Gallery - Visual Basic Tools for Visual Studio

    Visual Basic Tools for Visual Studio is a language service extension for Visual Studio 2012 and 2013 allowing to work on classic Visual Basic projects within Visual Studio. It´s intention is to provide better development tools for teams which have to maintain legacy code, or working on migration projects. Right now the toolset is still under development and some valuable features are not available yet, but it could already worth it to try.

    This is pre-release software which is not intended to be used in a live operating environment. The software is licensed "as-is" and you bear the risk of using it.

    What´s in the box?

    The extension adds the VB-CLASSIC menu item to the development environment; this menu allows to load classic VB workspace- and project-files and offers quick access to the extension´s options. This is not a converter nor another VB6 upgrade wizard. The import tool creates a new solution and MSBuild compatible projects. The project system synchronizes all changes made to a project with the corresponding VBP file; this allows to use this toolset in parallel with the Visual Basic 6 IDE.

    image

    Project System and Editor

    The package registers a new language service supporting Visual Basic 6 projects and code files. It integrates with the solution explorer and the code editor having support for syntax highlighting, basic outlining (allows to expand/collapse methods, properties and types) as well as navigation bar support.

    Project Properties Designer

    The project properties designer works directly on VBP files (MSBuild project files have only been introduced due to compatibility issues). The current version allows to display and edit a subset of classic VBP project settings (will probably be extended in future versions).

    ...

    While I had a production app in every version of VB Classic (well except for VB for DOS... remember that?) and while I personally feel the MS dev community needs to let it go (Really folks, "It's dead, Jim..."), I thought this extension very cool...

    Thursday, May 15, 2014

    Visual Studio 2013 and MSDN Licensing Whitepaper

    Microsoft Downloads - Visual Studio and MSDN Licensing White Paper

    This white paper provides an overview of the Visual Studio product line, including MSDN subscriptions, and the licensing requirements for those products in common deployment scenarios.

    Version: 1.0

    Date Published: 5/12/2014

    File Name:

    Visual Studio 2013 and MSDN Licensing Whitepaper - May-2014.docx

    Visual Studio 2013 and MSDN Licensing Whitepaper - May-2014.pdf

    Visual Studio 2013 and MSDN Licensing Whitepaper - May-2014.xps

    This white paper provides an overview of the Visual Studio product line and the licensing requirements for those products in common deployment scenarios. For a definitive guide to licensing terms and conditions for products licensed through Microsoft Volume Licensing, see the Microsoft Licensing Product Use Rights (PUR) document and applicable licensing agreements. For retail customers the license terms are specified in the End User Licensing Agreement (EULA) included with your product or with your MSDN subscription.

    The MSDN licensing question seems to come up, well seems like every time we get someone new. What with the RTM release up VS 2013.2 seems like a good time to cache this here for a future, "I blogged about it..." email... :)

    imageimage

    imageimageimage

     

    Related Past Post XRef:
    "Visual Studio 2012 and MSDN Licensing White Paper"
    Visual Studio 2010 and MSDN Licensing Whitepaper Updated
    Visual Studio 2010 Licensing White Paper (includes Team Foundation Server, Lab Management and IntelliTrace)

    Monday, May 12, 2014

    How does Microsoft scale Agile? Here's how, all in a very cool looking webzine

    Visual Studio - Engineering Stories 

    image

    Welcome to our new Engineering Stories site. This is a place for us to share how we build software at Microsoft. Today, we're releasing our first story describing how we adopted and scaled agile practices across Developer Division. It's a story describing our journey towards a faster release cadence, a more engaging engineering process, and, in the end... a better product. I hope you find these stories useful and engaging. Our goal is to share where we've found success, and also where we've struggled. Let us know what you think.

    Thanks.

    Scaling Agile Across the Enterprise

    A little history

    You might remember how we made software a decade ago – "we" being the entire software industry, Microsoft included. By today's standards, slow ... as ... molasses.

    We released products on two to three year cycles. It wasn't unheard of to spend six months to a year planning, a year or more coding, and then months packaging everything up for delivery. It worked in the software generation in which it was born, but today's environment requires a different approach. Today we buy software daily—often with just the touch of a finger on the device we're carrying with us. Market opportunities come and go more quickly, and customers demand increasingly faster turnaround to meet their needs.

    ...

    image

    I heard about the Microsoft DevDiv move toward agile at the 2012 Build and thought it could dramatically change the way we see software coming out Microsoft (or be a total bust). I can't say if it was indeed this move, but even the biggest hater has to admit, the software release cadence we're now seeing it nothing less than amazing, compared to just 5, heck 3, years ago. And the scary, in a good way, is that it looks like its speeding up!