Showing posts with label Utility. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Utility. Show all posts

Tuesday, March 25, 2014

A long, long time ago... Windows 8 Telnet Tip

The Windows Club - Watch Star Wars in Windows 8 using an old trick

You can unlock an old hidden trick on your Windows 8 computer. Fans of tricks on Windows operating systems will doubtlessly be aware of being able to watch Star Wars movie in ASCII using the Telnet service. Despite the trick being well known in earlier versions of Windows, if you’ve been trying to find it in Windows Vista and later versions, you may have ended up a little lost. The reason is that by default Telnet is turned off.

The Telnet Client is used to connect to a remote machine by using the Telnet protocol. It allows a computer to connect to a remote Telnet server and run applications on that server.

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This is the same one that's been available for like a billion years? Anyway... ah, the memories...

BTW, while your there, also check out, Blinkenlights.nl

A lot of interesting command line programs get overlooked, I find it a nice idea to place these things online, accessible through telnet.

Starwars Asciimation : Port 23

The though work was done by simon jansen, he made it into a java applet. This is the same thing, but now via telnet.

Marvin, the paranoid Android : Shut Down

This an Eliza like bot, that tries to emulate marvin the paranoid android from the hitchhikers guide. The bot is Splotch, the eliza like bot, coded by Duane K. Fields and Mark Rages. The dictionary is a mixture of the one from elizatalk and the one from bitchbot, an irc bot, by pim van riezen.

The Bofh Excuse Server : Port 666

This service spits out an excuse based on the bastard operator from hell stories, I find it quite useful while dealing with my daily work. This brilliant list/script is created by Jeff Ballard

 

Related Past Post XRef:
You've heard of ASCII Art? How about DNS Art!?
These are the papercraft you've been looking for... "Star Wars Papercraft..."
This is the infographic you're looking for... A Star Wars Infographic/Flowchart for every episode and more
[Hardware Music Hack] Star Wars Imperial March theme played by dual floppy drives
Star Wars Day – The Revenge of the Crafts!
Now this is the kind of vinyl I can appreciate... Self-adhesive vinyl Star Wars Return of the Jedi decals for living room/office that has everything...
“This is some rescue…” bookends for the Star Wars fan who has everything…
I'm not too old to have a Piñata at my next birthday.. am I? I wanna Death Star Piñata!
I think I want this for Valentine's Day...

Monday, March 24, 2014

Image Resizer for Windows Explorer (Right-Click... Resize Picture...)

Windows Enterprise Desktop - Image Resizer: Free, Handy Windows Explorer Shell Extension

For those not already familiar with the terminology, the software tool “Image Resizer for Windows” is what’s called an Explorer Shell Extension (aka ShellEx). When you install it on a Windows PC, it adds to Explorer’s capabilities. Thus, if you can puzzle your way into the screen capture to the left (which I resized using the very tool I’m writing about at the moment), you’ll see that an entry in the right-click Explorer menu called “Resize pictures” has been added to call put this utility to work. Selecting that menu entry produces the Image Resizer window that appears beneath the menu snippet, and shows that you can pick any of a number of default resizings (small, medium, large, or mobile). You can also create you own custom resizings as well (as I typically do for my blog posts, which are limited to 500 pixels in width, maximum).

For anybody who must work with images or screen captures on a regular basis, Image Resizer for Windows is a great add-in for their software toolbox. It’s a CodePlex project so it’s Open Source, free, and safe for general and widespread use. There’s even a server version that’s based on ASP.NET available through imageresizing.net. And for those whose memories go back far enough, yes indeed, this is a faithful replacement for the old Windows XP PowerToy also named Image Resizer. It’s pretty popular, too: according to the CodePlex home page for the tool, it’s been downloaded over 1.4 million times.

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Image Resizer for Windows

About
Image Resizer for Windows is a utility that lets you resize one or more selected image files directly from Windows Explorer by right-clicking. I created it so that modern Windows users could regain the joy they left behind with Microsoft's Image Resizer Powertoy for Windows XP.
Feedback & Support
If you need help installing or using the tool, use the Discussions tab to ask your question.
If you find a bug or think of a feature, use the Issue Tracker tab to submit your request.

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While it's been a couple years since this was updated/released, it's still a great tool for anyone doing "stuff" with images/pictures. Best part is the source is available... :)

 

Related Past Post XRef:
Easy image resizing for the digital camera happy - Image Resizer Powertoy clone for Vista & Windows 7 (32 & 64 bit)
Image Resizer PowerToy for XP and Vista - Easy Resizing of Images, Pictures, Digital Photos, etc via Windows Explorer

How-To schools you on SysInternals, "Using SysInternals Tools Like a Pro"

How-To Geek School - USING SYSINTERNALS TOOLS LIKE A PRO - Lesson 1: What Are the SysInternals Tools and How Do You Use Them?

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This How-To Geek School series will teach you how to use SysInternals tools like a pro, so your geek cred will never be in question. Not that we are questioning your geek skills. You do use SysInternals tools, right?

SCHOOL NAVIGATION

  1. What Are the SysInternals Tools and How Do You Use Them?
  2. Understanding Process Explorer
  3. Using Process Explorer to Troubleshoot and Diagnose
  4. Understanding Process Monitor
  5. Using Process Monitor in the Real World
  6. Using Autoruns to Deal with Startup Processes
  7. Using BgInfo to Display System Information
  8. Using the Command Line Tools

There are many other admin tools built into Windows, available for free on the web, or even through commercial sources, but none of them are quite as indispensible as the SysInternals suite of tools. That’s right, there’s a full set of free tools to do almost any administrator task, from monitoring or starting processes to peeking under the hood to see what files and registry keys your applications are really accessing.

These tools are used by every single reputable computer guy — if you want to separate the wheat from the chaff, just ask your local PC repair guy what Process Explorer is used for. If he doesn’t have a clue, he’s probably not quite as good as he says. (Don’t worry, if you don’t have a clue about procexp.exe either, we’ll cover that in-depth starting in lesson 2 of this series tomorrow).

Remember that time Sony tried to embed rootkits into their music CDs? Yeah, it was a SysInternals utility that first detected the problem, and it was the SysInternals guys that made the announcement. In 2006, Microsoft finally bought the company behind SysInternals, and they continue to provide the utilities for free on their web site.

This series will walk you through each of the important tools in the kit, get you familiar with them and their many features, and then help you understand how to use them in a real-world scenario. It’s a lot of very geeky material, but it’ll be a fun ride, so be sure to stay tuned.

What Are the SysInternals Tools Exactly?

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Nothing like a little SysInternals to make a Monday a little brighter... :)

Related Past Post XRef:
Mark TechEd's you... See all four of Mark Russinovich's recent TechEd North America sessions
The “Windows Sysinternals Primer: Process Explorer, Process Monitor, and More” from TechEd 2010 North America

"Utilizing SysInternals Tools for Windows Client" - The Seven Part Series..
A "Windows Sysinternals Administrator's Reference" book by Mark Russinovich? You had me a $30 pre-order special price (and Sysinternals... and Mark Russinovich... and... )
Sysinternals 101 – “Notes from the field,” a quick intro to a few Sysinternals utilities (Process Explorer, TCPView, Process Monitor, VMMap)
Hands On Learning How to Use the Sysinternals Process Monitor Utility

Process Explorer v16.0 is out and now cooking with VirusTotal
Disk2vhd turns 2, v2.0 that is, and a few more Sysinternals utility updates
New Sysinternals utility released today, Disk2vhd v1.0 – Yes ...

A Sweet Summer Sysinternals Suite Refresh
It's a sweet suite! Windows Sysinternals Suite gets a summer refresh [August 3, 2012]...
Sysinternals Suite 2010 Refreshed - All the latest versions, one 12.4MB zip…
Sysinternals Suite Refreshed – All the latest Sysinternals Utilities, one tiny zip (well 10MB zip…)
Sysinternals Suite (8MB of Complete Sysinternals Goodness)

Mesh'ing Live.Sysinternals.com, using Vista Scheduling and Robocopy|
A handy PowerShell script to keep your Sysinternals Suite up to date
The latest Sysinternals utilities are just a URL away, Live.Sysinternals.com

Use the Sysinternals Utilities? The EULA bug dialog you? Then try this…

More desktops for Windows 8 with Sysinternals Desktops v2.0
It's a sunny day when we get a new Sysinternals utility...
It’s a new Sysinternals Tool Day! RAMMap v1.0 released!

Wednesday, January 29, 2014

Process Explorer v16.0 is out and now cooking with VirusTotal!

Sysinternals Site Discussion - Updates: Process Explorer v16.0, PsPing v2.01

Process Explorer v16.0: Thanks to collaboration with the team at VirusTotal, this Process Explorer update introduces integration with VirusTotal.com, an online antivirus analysis service. When enabled, Process Explorer sends the hashes of images and files shown in the process and DLL views to VirusTotal and if they have been previously scanned, reports how many antivirus engines identified them as possibly malicious. Hyperlinked results take you to VirusTotal.com report pages and you can even submit files for scanning.

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Process Explorer v16.0

Ever wondered which program has a particular file or directory open? Now you can find out. Process Explorer shows you information about which handles and DLLs processes have opened or loaded.

The Process Explorer display consists of two sub-windows. The top window always shows a list of the currently active processes, including the names of their owning accounts, whereas the information displayed in the bottom window depends on the mode that Process Explorer is in: if it is in handle mode you'll see the handles that the process selected in the top window has opened; if Process Explorer is in DLL mode you'll see the DLLs and memory-mapped files that the process has loaded. Process Explorer also has a powerful search capability that will quickly show you which processes have particular handles opened or DLLs loaded.

The unique capabilities of Process Explorer make it useful for tracking down DLL-version problems or handle leaks, and provide insight into the way Windows and applications work.

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Nice... Of course a good virus will be cloaked via a rootkit, but still, I think this is pretty neat (especially have just finished Mark's Zero Day novel... ;)

 

Related Past Post XRef:
Disk2vhd turns 2, v2.0 that is, and a few more Sysinternals utility updates
New Sysinternals utility released today, Disk2vhd v1.0 – Yes ...

Mark TechEd's you... See all four of Mark Russinovich's recent TechEd North America sessions
The “Windows Sysinternals Primer: Process Explorer, Process Monitor, and More” from TechEd 2010 North America

"Utilizing SysInternals Tools for Windows Client" - The Seven Part Series..
A "Windows Sysinternals Administrator's Reference" book by Mark Russinovich? You had me a $30 pre-order special price (and Sysinternals... and Mark Russinovich... and... )
Sysinternals 101 – “Notes from the field,” a quick intro to a few Sysinternals utilities (Process Explorer, TCPView, Process Monitor, VMMap)
Hands On Learning How to Use the Sysinternals Process Monitor Utility

A Sweet Summer Sysinternals Suite Refresh
It's a sweet suite! Windows Sysinternals Suite gets a summer refresh [August 3, 2012]...
Sysinternals Suite 2010 Refreshed - All the latest versions, one 12.4MB zip…
Sysinternals Suite Refreshed – All the latest Sysinternals Utilities, one tiny zip (well 10MB zip…)
Sysinternals Suite (8MB of Complete Sysinternals Goodness)

Mesh'ing Live.Sysinternals.com, using Vista Scheduling and Robocopy|
A handy PowerShell script to keep your Sysinternals Suite up to date
The latest Sysinternals utilities are just a URL away, Live.Sysinternals.com

Use the Sysinternals Utilities? The EULA bug dialog you? Then try this…

More desktops for Windows 8 with Sysinternals Desktops v2.0
It's a sunny day when we get a new Sysinternals utility...
It’s a new Sysinternals Tool Day! RAMMap v1.0 released

Tuesday, January 14, 2014

What are Perforator and Visual Profiler? Free, that's what... Welcome to the WPF Performance Suite

Visual Studio Magazine - .Net Tips and Tricks - Free Tool: WPF Performance Suite

I like Windows Presentation Foundation (WPF) very much, especially its implementation of the Model-View-Controller (MVC) design pattern. I've also grown to appreciate XAML as a declarative (if quirky) way of building complex user interfaces that integrate with a testable code file. However, every once in a while, I end up with a WPF Window that takes a long time to render, or renders in a bizarre series of jumps. If that's happened to you, it's worthwhile to download Microsoft's WPF Performance Suite.

The suite includes two tools: Perforator and Visual Profiler. Neither will tell you what to do to fix your problem, but both will help you locate the problem.

Perforator concentrates on the low-level routines that render your XAML. The download page for the package includes some useful information ...

While Perforator looks at how WPF is rendering your XAML, Visual Profiler shows how individual ...

WPF Performance Suite

The Windows SDK includes a suite of performance profiling tools for Windows Presentation Foundation (WPF) applications called the WPF Performance Suite. The WPF Performance Suite enables you to analyze the run-time behavior of your WPF applications and determine performance optimizations that you can apply. The WPF Performance Suite includes performance profiling tools called Perforator and Visual Profiler. This topic describes how to install and use the Perforator and Visual Profiler tools in the WPF Performance Suite.

This topic contains the following sections:

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Perforator

Perforator is a performance profiling tool for analyzing the rendering behavior of your WPF application. The Perforator user interface displays a set of graphs that enable you to analyze very specific rendering behavior in parts of your application, such as the dirty rectangle addition rate and the frame rate. WPF uses a rendering technique called dirty rectangle, which means that only the portions of the screen that have changed are rendered on a new rendering pass. In addition, Perforator has several options that you can use to look for specific rendering problems. Perforator also reports the software rendering targets and a slider to control the duration of the graphs. The following illustration shows the Perforator user interface.

Perforator user interface

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Visual Profiler

Visual Profiler is a performance profiling tool of WPF services, such as layout, rendering, and animation, for elements in the visual tree. By analyzing the profiling output of this tool, you can determine which visual elements in your application may be causing performance bottlenecks.

Visual Profiler presents performance issues in the context of the basic building blocks that are used to construct visual scenes in your application. These building blocks include high-level objects, such as Button and TextBlock controls, as well as low-level objects, such as Line and Ellipse elements. Instead of describing performance issues in terms of call graphs of functions names, Visual Profiler describes these issues by using the representation of visual objects. This is similar to the way the Windows SDK tool, UI Spy, represents information. For more information, see UISpy.exe (UI Spy).

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Some pretty cool utilities that I don't remember seeing before... I'm almost afraid (heck, no almost about it)  to run them on my WPF LOB app's... :/

Wednesday, January 08, 2014

Tips on being a little Modern in a Desktop world (Windows 8.1 Tips)

Groovy Post - Windows 8.1: Make Using Modern Apps From the Desktop Easier

Windows 8.1’s modern or metro-style apps are mostly an afterthought on a traditional computer with mouse and keyboard. However, on a touch-enabled device, they are much more useful and the desktop seems dated. It’s difficult to hit the targets on the desktop correctly using your finger. Although, I did write an article on how to make the desktop more touch-friendly.

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Use ModernMix ...

Launch Modern Apps from Desktop ...

Bonus Tip: Stop Desktop Files from Opening in Modern Apps ...

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A number of nice tips for those who live in the Windows 8.x Desktop but still like to visit the other world (whatever it's called).

Thursday, December 19, 2013

Disk2vhd turns 2, v2.0 that is, and a few more Sysinternals utility updates

Sysinternals Site Discussion - Updates: Coreinfo v3.21, Disk2vhd v2.0, LiveKd v5.31

Coreinfo v3.21: CoreInfo is a command-line tool for reporting processor topology, NUMA performance, and processor features. The v3.21 release adds microcode reporting.

Disk2vhd v2.0: Disk2vhd, a utility for performing physical-to-virtual conversion of Windows systems, adds support for VHDX-formatted VHDs (thanks to Brendan Gruber for contributions), now supports WinRE volumes, can capture removable media, and includes an option to capture live volumes instead of relying on volume shadow copy (VSS).

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LiveKd v5.31: LiveKd is a utility for performing live kernel debugging of native systems and virtual machines from the host ...

V2 for Disk2vhd seems weird doesn't it, given how long that utility has been around. In any case, it's great seeing it get some love. I wonder how it will evolve in the new Azure world? Disk2vhd2Azure would be kind of cool... :)

 

Related Past Post XRef:
New Sysinternals utility released today, Disk2vhd v1.0 – Yes ...

A Sweet Summer Sysinternals Suite Refresh

Thursday, December 05, 2013

wxHexEditor, your new large, 16EBs (exabytes) large, file editor?

beta news - Open files of any size with wxHexEditor

The PC world has plenty of hex editors; does it really need another? Our first thought was probably not, but that was before we’d spent a little time with the fast, feature-packed and extremely capable wxHexEditor.

Some hex editors have annoying limits on file sizes, for instance. But not this one. WxHexEditor can handle files up to 2^64 in size, that’s 16 billion gigabytes, which will probably be enough for the foreseeable future.

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There are plenty of other interesting options hidden away in the menus. We found tools to compare two files and highlight the differences; calculate a host of checksums (MDx, SHAx, RipeMDx, HAVALx, TIGERx and more) for any given view; back up, restore or erase the contents of any device.

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wxHexEditor

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WxHexEditor isn't limited to files. Click Devices > Open Disk Device and you can also open one of your drives and browse through its sectors. (Try running the program as an administrator if a particular drive isn't listed.)

Whatever you've opened, wxHexEditor allows you to view its contents. You can search for text or hex values, manually edit bytes or run search and replace operations (files are by default set to Read-Only, reducing the chance of accidental alterations).

And despite its lowly 0.22 version number, wxHexEditor has even more options hidden away in its menus. You can calculate 25+ checksums for any given file, for instance, or compare two files and highlight any differences.

Verdict:

As a beta it needs to be used carefully, but wxHexEditor is already a very powerful tool, fast and packed with essential features.

wxHexEditor

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Events:

  • Version 0.22 Beta Released (09/05/2013)
    • Now, supporting many codepages/encodings, including almost all DOS, ECBDIC, Windows CPs.
    • Also supporting multi character codepages like Shift JIS, UTF8/16/32 and others....
    • Added gksu and gksudo support for easy privilage elevations.
    • Added Russian translation, non-complete. (by Nikolai Novikov)
    • Fixed MacOSX binary issues that appears at old version due wx2.9
    • Many bug fixes also some usage changes.
  • Version 0.21 Beta Released (01/01/2013)
    • Device and Partition Backup/Restore and Erase tools.
    • Customizeable hex panel formatting.
    • Customizeable colours!
    • Linux Process Memory Read/Write access.
    • MultiLocale support with Turkish Language
    • Options Panel
    • Fixed Hex control input

Features:

  • It uses 64 bit file descriptors (supports files or devices up to 2^64 bytes , means some exabytes but tested only 1 PetaByte file (yet). ).
  • It does NOT copy whole file to your RAM. That make it FAST and can open files (which sizes are Multi Giga < Tera < Peta < Exabytes)
  • You can work with delete/insert bytes to file, more than once, without creating temp file!.
  • Could open your devices on Linux, Windows or MacOSX.
  • Memory Usage : Currently ~25 MegaBytes while opened multiple > ~8GB files.
  • Could operate with file thru XOR encryption.
  • Has multiple views to show multiple files in same time.
  • Has x86 disassembly support (via integrated udis86 library) to hack things little faster.
  • Has colourfull tags to make reverse engineering easier and more fun.
  • You can copy/edit your Disks, HDD Sectors with it.( Usefull for rescue files/partitions by hand. )
  • Sector Indication on Disk devices, also has Go to Sector dialog...
  • Formated CopyAs! It's easy to copy part of a file in HEX format for C/C++ source, ASM source, also supports HTML,phpBB and Wiki page formats with TAGs!!
  • Supports Hex or Text editor alone operation.Also can disable Offset region.
  • Supports customizeable hex panel formatting and colors.
  • Allows Linux Process Memory Editing operations
  • Comparison of binary files, allows merge of near results.
  • Supports ***many*** encodings including almost all DOS/Windows/MacOS CPs and multi-character sets like UTF8/16/32, Shift JIS, GBK, EUC_KR...
  • Decimal, Hexadecimal, Octal and LBA ("Sector+Offset") addressing modes, (switchable one to another by right click of mouse on Offset panel.
  • Save selection as a dump file feature for make life easier.
  • "Find Some Bytes" feature for quickly find next meaningful bytes at file/Disk
  • MD/RIPEMD/SHA/TIGER/HAVAL/CRC/ADLER/GOST/WHRILPOOL/SNEFRU checksum functions (via integrated mhash library.)
  • Import & Export TAGs support from file.
  • Written with C++/wxWidgets GUI libs and can be used with other OSes such as Mac OS, Windows as native application.

Every so often I need to open some pretty big files and always seem to have to search for an app each time. Caching this here so the next time I can give this one a try. Besides being able to open some pretty big files (16 EB... awesome) I dig some of it other features, like the hashing and device access.

On yeah, it's open source too...

Think your passwords rock? Check out Telepathwords from Microsoft Research (which might have you thinking again about those passwords)

Microsoft Research - Avoiding Vulnerable Passwords—and Rules, Too

You could think of it as a brainteaser: Create a sequence of eight or more characters that includes at least one uppercase letter, one lowercase letter, a digit, and a symbol, that doesn’t contain any words in English, and that is memorable enough that you can recall it.

For most of us, unfortunately, the challenge posed by these rules isn’t fun—it’s a painful chore forced upon us when choosing a password to access an email account, a company network, or a website.

Passwords that contain symbols and uppercase letters to meet these rules also tend to be difficult to type, especially on mobile devices.

Even worse, adhering to the rules doesn’t guarantee that your account or your password-protected data will remain secure. A surprising number of passwords that follow these rules are easily guessed by malicious hackers: “P@$$w0rd1,” for example, or “Qwerty123!”. If you specify one of these passwords, most login systems won’t raise any objections.

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The free online research tool, launched Dec. 5, is called Telepathwords. Users can visit the project website and test the strength of their passwords—current ones, past ones, or ones they’re considering using.

“The system doesn’t ask the user to learn anything up-front or follow any specific rules,” Schechter says. “Rather, as you type each key of your intended password, it displays the characters it thinks you’re most likely to type next. If it succeeds in predicting one or more characters of the rest of your password, the evidence that these characters are predictable will be right in front of your eyes.”

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Using Telepathwords feels similar to the autocomplete feature in search engines, except that it discourages you from following its predictions. Predictable characters don’t do much to increase the security of your password against those who might try to guess it, so if you type one of the three characters predicted by Telepathwords, a red X will appear above it. If you choose a character that is not among those predicted by Telepathwords, a green checkmark will appear above it.

While not truly telepathic, Telepathwords is endowed with great deal of knowledge about how users choose passwords. It knows all the usual substitutions, such as substituting the dollar sign ($) for an S. Telepathwords also looks for passwords constructed by moving a finger around the keyboard, regardless of direction. It has an extensive list of known-popular passwords, as well as a dictionary of English words and a list of common phrases obtained from Microsoft’s Bing search engine. And it’s wise to all sorts of tricks that users have devised—and attackers have long recognized—such as putting an asterisk between the letters of a familiar word.

Telepathwords also responds—with a diplomatically worded pop-up message—to passwords that rely on common substitutions or contain profanity, both of which attackers also are keenly aware.

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Telepathwords

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Kind of fun and kind of scary all at the same time...

Friday, November 15, 2013

New from NirSoft - WhoIsConnected[to my darn network]Sniffer

NirBlog - New utility that lists computers and devices connected to your network

WhoIsConnectedSniffer is a new utility that listens to network packets on your network adapter using a capture driver (WinpCap or MS network monitor) and accumulates a list of computer and devices currently connected to your network. ...

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NirSoft - WhoIsConnectedSniffer v1.00

WhoIsConnectedSniffer is a network discovery tool that listens to network packets on your network adapter using a capture driver (WinpCap or MS network monitor) and accumulates a list of computer and devices currently connected to your network. WhoIsConnectedSniffer uses various protocols to detect the computers connected to your network, including ARP, UDP, DHCP, mDNS, and BROWSER.

For every detected computer or device, the following information is displayed: (Some of the fields might be empty if the information cannot be found inside the packets) IP Address, MAC Address, name of the device/computer, description, Operating System, Network Adapter Company, IPv6 Address.

After collecting the connected computers/devices information, you can easily export the list to tab-delimited/comma-delimited/xml/html file.

WhoIsConnectedSniffer vs Other NirSoft Tools

As you may know, NirSoft already provides other tools (Wireless Network Watcher, NetBScanner) that scan the network and show the computers that are currently connected. As opposed to the other tools, WhoIsConnectedSniffer doesn't perform any scanning and it doesn't send any packet to the other computers. WhoIsConnectedSniffer only listens to the packets sent by other computers and devices, analyzes them and then displays the result on the main window.

WhoIsConnectedSniffer also provides some information that the other tools cannot get, like operating system, description text of the computer, IPv6 address.

System Requirements And Limitations

  • Any version of Windows, starting from Windows 2000, and up to Windows 8. Both 32-bit and 64-bit systems are supported. When using Microsoft Network Monitor driver on 64-bit system, you must use the 64-bit version of WhoIsConnectedSniffer.
  • You have to install one of the following capture drivers:
  • WhoIsConnectedSniffer cannot detect a device or computer if it doesn't send any packet that is received by the computer running this tool.
  • WhoIsConnectedSniffer cannot detect computers from other subnets.

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Protocols supported by WhoIsConnectedSniffer

  • ARP: WhoIsConnectedSniffer listens to this protocol to get the IP address and MAC address of computers and devices.
  • UDP: When a computer broadcasts a UDP packet to all other computers, WhoIsConnectedSniffer extracts from it the IP address and the MAC address.
  • DHCP: When a computer connects to the network, it usually sends a DHCP request. WhoIsConnectedSniffer uses this request to get the host name and IP address of the computer.
  • mDNS: This protocol is used on Linux and Mac OS systems. WhoIsConnectedSniffer uses it to get the host name and IP address of the computer, and also the operating system (on Linux)
  • BROWSER: This protocol is mainly used by Windows, but some Linux systems supports this protocol too. WhoIsConnectedSniffer uses it to get the name of the computer, description text of the computer, and the operating system.

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License

This utility is released as freeware. You are allowed to freely distribute this utility via floppy disk, CD-ROM, Internet, or in any other way, as long as you don't charge anything for this and you don't sell it or distribute it as a part of commercial product. If you distribute this utility, you must include all files in the distribution package, without any modification !

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Cool tool from the cool guys at NirSoft [insert my usual, "These guys are like the old Wininternals/Sysinternals guys" snip here. Mark R, you following these guys? ...]

Tuesday, November 12, 2013

It's Log Parser Day! Robert Sheldon shows how Log Parser can be used for ETL

SQL Home - SQL Tools - Microsoft's Log Parser Utility: Swell ETL

For loading text, CSV or XML files into SQL Server, the Log Parser utility, with its amazing SQL engine,  is likely to be the obvious choice. Although initially developed purely for converting IIS logs, the Log Parser can turn its hand to a range of formats including even event logs or the windows registry.  

First off, Microsoft’s Log Parser utility is not a SQL Server tool. Log Parser is a powerful Windows command-line utility that can extract data from a variety of sources—IIS logs, XML and CSV files, Active Directory objects, Network Monitor capture files, and the Windows registry, to name a few—and output the data to various files and systems, most notably SQL Server. In fact, Log Parser makes importing data into a SQL Server database so simple, you’ll wonder why you haven’t been using the tool all along.

At the core of the Log Parser utility is a “SQL-like” engine that processes data as it’s retrieved from the source and sent to the destination. You can think of Log Parser as a mini extract, transform, and load (ETL) application that uses input formats to extract data from its source and output formats to send the data to its destination.

An input format provides the source data to the engine as a record set, similar to the way rows are stored in a table. Each input format serves as a record provider specific to the source from which the data is retrieved. For example, you would use the xml input provider to retrieve data from an XML file.

Output formats also present the processed information as record data, with each output format specific to the target destination type. If you were sending data to a SQL Server database, for instance, you would use the sql output format.

For details about the available input and output formats supported by Log Parser, as well as information about other features, see the Log Parser help file (LogParser.chm). The file is added to the directory where Log Parser is installed when you do a complete installation or you include the documentation component as part of a custom installation. You can download Log Parser from the Microsoft Download Center. There you will also find installation instructions.

Using Log Parser to retrieve data

Log Parser comes in two versions: a command-line executable and a DLL containing COM objects that applications can use to run Log Parser operations. This article focuses on the command-line utility and how you can use it to import data into a SQL Server database.

...

Working with Log Parser

The examples I’ve shown you in this article have all retrieved data from the System event log, but you’re certainly not limited to that log. You can retrieve data from other event logs, multiple logs, and a variety of other sources, such as Active Directory, the registry, IIS logs, text files, or information about the file directory itself. Log Parser is a flexible and powerful tool that can be useful in a variety of circumstances. And because of the utility’s “SQL-like” logic, most of the data you can retrieve through Log Parser can be saved to a SQL Server database. If you can write a T-SQL SELECT statement, you can use Log Parser to store all sorts of information in your SQL Server databases.

imageimage

Robert's post is actually a great, in-depth post on one more more useful yet overlooked utilities, Log Parser...

And anyway, it's been nearly a month since the last Log Parser post! You can't expect me to hold off forever, do you? :P

 

Related Past Post XRef:
PIE! (charts) - Log Parser and the Office Web Components together turns your logs into pie charts and more..

Log Parser Studio 2.0 now out (Log Parser GUI++)
Log Parser Studio - Think "Log Parser GUI" Or "Making Log Parser click-click fun and easy to use..." or "Query Analyzer for Log Parser"

Learning Log Parser Studio in two parts... (From Install to Library Ninja)

Here's a look at the Microsoft Log Parser from a different point of view, from the Computer Forensics' side of the house OR Check out a 'Query Analyzer/SSMS' for Log Parser called Log Parser Lizard

Log Parser Ping Graph Fun (aka “Using Log Parser to parse command line output”)
SELECT * FROM Log... with the cool tool that’s been around for years, Log Parser!

Download details: Log Parser 2.2

The Unofficial Log Parser Support Site
IIS Diagnostics Toolkit (January 2006)
SQL Server 2000 Report Pack for IIS Logs

Thursday, October 31, 2013

WindowSMART (The HD/SSD health monitoring, reporting and alerting tools) goes open, yes, open source...

WindowSMART

image

WindowSMART 2013 and Home Server SMART 2013 are powerful hard disk and solid state disk (SSD) health monitoring, reporting and alerting tools for Windows. WindowSMART 2013 is a standalone application, available in both x86 (32-bit) and x64 (64-bit) versions. Home Server SMART 2013 is a Dashboard add-in for specialized versions of Windows.

WindowSMART 2013 was originally developed as a Shareware application. On October 28, 2013, its developer Matthew Sawyer, owner of Dojo North Software, LLC, decided to turn WindowSMART and Home Server SMART over to the open source community. I work full-time for HP as a Microsoft SharePoint consultant, and the demands of running a side business conflicted with my family. With two young children, I want to be a better dad and thus decided I shouldn't be consuming all my free time working on a side business when I could be spending it with my family.

WindowSMART 2013 - Supported Platforms

  • Windows XP SP-3 and later
  • Windows XP 64-bit edition SP-2 and later
  • Windows Vista
  • Windows 7
  • Windows 8
  • Windows 8.1
  • Windows Server 2003 SP-2 and later
  • Windows Server 2008
  • Windows Server 2008 R2
  • Windows Server 2012
  • Windows Server 2012 R2

Home Server SMART 2013 - Supported Systems
  • Windows Home Server 2011
  • Windows Small Business Server 2011 Essentials
  • Windows Storage Server 2008 R2 Essentials
  • Windows Server 2012 Essentials
  • Windows Server 2012 R2 Essentials

...

From Shareware to Open Source
In January 2010 I created Home Server SMART as an add-in for Windows Home Server ("v1"), which later became known as Home Server SMART Classic. In June 2012 I released WindowSMART as a Shareware application to help supplement my family's income.

To make a very long story short, WindowSMART has grown to a point where it's a full-time job. I already have a full-time job with HP, a family and in early 2013 I started exercising again to combat obesity. I'm not Superman; there are only 24 hours in a day but I needed about 30 hours a day to take all of this on.

And so I decided the best future for WindowSMART 2013, Home Server SMART 2013 and Home Server SMART Classic lies with the open source community. I think I made a very good product--I'd love to see the open source community make it a great product.

Product Key
Because WindowSMART 2013 was initially released as a Shareware product, it still requires a product key even though it is now open source. I've generated a product key and attached it here. I will soon make a license key generator available on my website which you can use if you'd like a personalized key. There is no charge for the key. Donations, of course, are always welcome. :)

Brave step Matthew! Thanks for taking the time to OSS this and not let it just fade away into the dark...

Friday, October 25, 2013

Jesse's got your number (of Insanely Essential Programmer Utilities)...

Jesse Liberty - Two Dozen Insanely Essential Programmer Utilities*

Lately I’ve been focused much more on Web development.  Along the way, I’ve discovered a number of utilities that are simply essential to successful coding, depending of course on which frameworks and libraries you are using.  Here’s a sampling, intended only to piqué your interest, not to explore any of these in depth…

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Since we've not gotten an a recent update to Scott's Ultimate Developer and Power Users Tool List (Wow, it's been two years?) I guess we'll just have to get a stand-in, like Jesse's shorter, but still cool, list of utilities.

 

Related Past Post XRef:
It's tool time baby! As in Scott Hanselman's 2011 Ultimate Developer and Power Users Tool List!
Scott Hanselman has updated his monster (and must read) “Ultimate Developer and Power Users Tool List for Windows”!
It's that time... Scott's Ultimate Developer and Power Users Tool List for 2007
Scott Hanselman's 2006 Ultimate Developer and Power Users Tool List for Windows is Out
Scott Hanselman's 2005 Ultimate Developer and Power Users Tool List
Scott Hanselman's [2003] Ultimate Developer and Power Users Tools List

Friday, October 11, 2013

PIE! (charts) - Log Parser and the Office Web Components together turns your logs into pie charts and more..

Peter Viola - Enhancing Log Parser Reports with Charts

When you need quick analysis of your traffic logs you won’t find an better tool than Microsoft’s free Log Parser. With Log Parser you can read a variety of log files including the Registry and Windows event logs. It’s ease of use comes from using SQL queries against your log file. You can get your data even faster by using multiple log parser queries in a batch file.

image

The other day I was helping someone who needed some “top 10” data from their site’s log. Since I had these in my trusty batch file I could provide the text reports within seconds. However, I like to offer a little more pizzazz when possible so this time I decided use Log Parser’s native charting capability to output the results with some nice charts.  As the saying goes a picture is worth a thousand words.

Here’s the query I used to create the chart above:

logparser.exe -i:iisw3c "select top 10 cs-uri-stem, count(*)  into top10requests.gif
from <file> group by cs-uri-stem order by count(*) desc"
-o:CHART -chartType:pieexploded3d -categories:off -chartTitle:"Top 10 Requests"

Command line driven charts via one of my favorite tools. Think "Manager Safe Log Reports..." (Oh, wait, I've been a manager... well, then I guess I should know! ;)

 

Related Past Post XRef:
Log Parser Studio 2.0 now out (Log Parser GUI++)
Log Parser Studio - Think "Log Parser GUI" Or "Making Log Parser click-click fun and easy to use..." or "Query Analyzer for Log Parser"

Learning Log Parser Studio in two parts... (From Install to Library Ninja)

Here's a look at the Microsoft Log Parser from a different point of view, from the Computer Forensics' side of the house OR Check out a 'Query Analyzer/SSMS' for Log Parser called Log Parser Lizard

Log Parser Ping Graph Fun (aka “Using Log Parser to parse command line output”)
SELECT * FROM Log... with the cool tool that’s been around for years, Log Parser!

Download details: Log Parser 2.2

The Unofficial Log Parser Support Site
IIS Diagnostics Toolkit (January 2006)
SQL Server 2000 Report Pack for IIS Logs

Thursday, September 26, 2013

Did you get the message? Message Analyzer v1.0 has RTW'd

MessageAnalyzer - Message Analyzer has Released – A New Beginning

We are excited to announce the official release of Message Analyzer to the Microsoft Download Center. Sci-Fi movie references aside, this really is a new beginning for troubleshooting and analysis. Message Analyzer brings a set of new ideas, new techniques, and new paradigms in order to make analysis of protocols, log files, and system events a cohesive activity which allows correlation across all those types of traces.

New Ways to Capture

As I detailed in the Network Capture is Dead blog, we have updated the way we capture messages. By leveraging ETW and providing inspection points to capture at the Firewall and HTTP Proxy layers, you can capture loopback and encrypted traffic ...

New Ways to Analyze

There are also new ways to analyze and organize the trace data. Automatic diagnosis and coalescing of fragments and messages provide a concise and succinct view allowing you to focus on the problems and not the noise. New visualizations let you see a problem at a high level, and then dig in by viewing selected data in detail in the Analysis Grid. New tools like....

New Ways to Share

The world is full of many specialized areas each with their own silos of knowledge. Subject matter experts need a way to share this expertise so that everybody can benefit and learn from the masters. ....

Analyze Now

...

Microsoft Downloads - Microsoft Message Analyzer

Message Analyzer enables you to capture, display, and analyze protocol messaging traffic; and to trace and assess system events and other messages from Windows components

Version: 1.0

Date Published: 9/24/2013

Message Analyzer FAQ and Known Issues.docx, 126 KB

MessageAnalyzer.msi, 33.6 MB

MessageAnalyzer64.msi, 33.9 MB

Microsoft Message Analyzer is a new tool for capturing, displaying, and analyzing protocol messaging traffic and other system messages. Message Analyzer also enables you to import, aggregate, and analyze data from log and trace files. It is the successor to Microsoft Network Monitor 3.4 and a key component in the Protocol Engineering Framework (PEF) that was created by Microsoft for the improvement of protocol design, development, documentation, testing, and support. With Message Analyzer, you can choose to capture data live or load archived message collections from multiple data sources simultaneously.

Message Analyzer enables you to display trace, log, and other message data in numerous data viewer formats, including a default tree grid view and other selectable graphical views that employ grids, charts, and timeline visualizer components which provide high-level data summaries and other statistics. It also enables you to configure your own custom data viewers. In addition, Message Analyzer is not only an effective tool for troubleshooting network issues, but for testing and verifying protocol implementations as well.

Supported Operating System

Windows 7, Windows 8, Windows 8.1, Windows Server 2008 R2, Windows Server 2012, Windows Server 2012 R2

32-bit and 64-bit of Windows 7, Windows 8, Windows 8.1, Windows Server 2008, Windows Server 2012 and Windows Server 2012 R2

Microsoft Message Analyzer Operating Guide

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Related Past Post XRef:
Microsoft Message Analyzer better in Beta 2 (Gantt viewer, Quick filter, Parsing REST Protocols and more)
Goodbye Microsoft Network Monitor... Hello Microsoft Message Analyzer!

Capturing data (cough… passwords… cough) on unsecured wireless isn’t hard… (so don’t use them or SSL it baby!)

Network Monitor (NetMon/NM) 3.3 Released
NetMon Parsers – Existing parsers available and more coming via CodePlex
NetMon API – Capture, Parse and and Capture File Access (with Managed P/Invoke example too)
Network Monitor 3.2 (aka NetMon, NM3) Beta Released – Now with application network conversation tracking UI
NetMon 3.1 Released
Network Monitor 3 (aka NetMon 3, aka NM3) Re-released for Vista
NetMon 3.0 RTW

Thursday, September 19, 2013

OSS that a sysadmin can love... InfoWorld's 12 Sysadmin CodePlex Gems...

InfoWorld - Microsoft CodePlex: 12 open source gems for every Windows admin

Microsoft CodePlex gems: 12 open source tools every Windows admin will love

While it may seem antithetical to Microsoft’s image, free open source tools abound for Microsoft admins, many of which are hosted by Microsoft itself on CodePlex, the company’s free open source project hosting site.

The tools offered at CodePlex are diverse and often downright awesome. Whether you’re working with Windows, Windows Server, SharePoint, Exchange, you name it, CodePlex is a rich resource for filling out your Microsoft-based toolset -- and at the right price: free.

The following 12 CodePlex projects are some of the best, but the site offers thousands of others that can benefit IT and developer pros alike. Happy hunting.

I've used a number of these and agree that they rock. One that many of us have used, but maybe didn't know it was OSS is the Windows 7/8 USB/DVD Download Tool (https://wudt.codeplex.com). Yep, it looks like this is "that" tool...

BTW, I don't get credit for finding this, Martin Woodward found this and due to my role on This Week on Channel 9, I kind of stole, well borrowed, it from him (hint, you'll this also mentioned in tomorrow's show).

Friday, September 13, 2013

New from NirSoft, SoundVolumeView (think "Uber volume control with profiles, command line and more" utility)

NirBlog - New utility to control the sound volume on Windows Vista/7/8/2008

SoundVolumeView is a new tool for Windows Vista/7/8/2008 that displays general information and current volume level for all active sound components on your system, and allows you to mute and unmute them instantly.

SoundVolumeView also allows you to save a sound profile into a file, containing the current volume level and the mute/unmute state of all sound components, as well as the default sound devices, and then later, load the same file to restore exactly the same volume levels and settings.

There is also extensive command-line support, which allows you to save/load profiles, change current volume of every sound component, and mute/unmute every sound component, without displaying any user interface.

NirSoft - SoundVolumeView v1.00

...

This utility works on Windows Vista, Windows 7, Windows 8, and Windows 2008. Both 32-bit and 64-bit systems are supported.
Windows XP and older systems are not supported

image

Start Using SoundVolumeView

SoundVolumeView doesn't require any installation process or additional dll files. In order to start using it, simply run the executable file - SoundVolumeView.exe

After running SoundVolumeView, the main window is displays all sound items found in your systems. There are 3 types of items: devices, subunits, and application volume.
For every item, the current volume level is displayed in percent unit. For devices and subunits, the volume level is also displayed in Decibel. For subunits, the volume level is displayed for every channel separately.

Increase/Decrease/Mute Volume

In the main window of SoundVolumeView, you can select one or more items, and then mute, unmute, increase, or decrease the volume of selected items, using accelerator keys:

...

Sound Profiles

SoundVolumeView allows you to save all your current sound settings into a sound profile filename, and then load it later when you want to restore these settings.
The sound profile file stores the following information:
  • Volume level of all active sound components on your system. (Devices, Subunits, and application volume) For Subunits, the volume level of every channel is stored separately.
  • Mute/Unmute state of all active sound components on your system. (Devices, Subunits, and application volume)
  • Default render/capture device.

You can save and load sound profiles by using the 'Save Sound Profile' and 'Load Sound Profile' options under the File menu, or by using the /SaveProfile and /LoadProfile command-line options. There is also a recent menu located under the File menu, which allows you to easily load the last 10 sound profiles you used, as well as you can also load the recent 5 sound profiles from the tray menu (If the tray icon is turned on)

Be aware that sound profiles are bound to specific computer and its devices. You cannot save a sound profile in one computer and then load it into another computer.

Command-Line Options

You can use the command-line options below to change the volume level and mute/unmute status of every sound component on your system.
In the [Name] parameter , you can specify one of the following fields:
  • The name of the item, as appeared under the 'Name' column. (If you have multiple items with identical name, you should use the ID field.)
  • The ID of the item, as appeared under the 'Item ID' column.
  • For sound devices (Type = 'Device'), you can also use the value specified under the 'Device Name' column.
  • For application items (type = 'Application), you can also specify the process filename, for example: firefox.exe

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NirSoft (the heir apparent Sysinternals?) continues to provide a series of awesome utilities for Windows. I mean check out some of the available tools and utilities;

image

See what I mean?

Sunday, August 04, 2013

[Book Review] "Building Interactive Queries with LINQPad"

As I mentioned a couple days ago, [Book Review - Preview] "Building Interactive Queries with LINQPad",  the team at Packt have given me the opportunity to review Building Interactive Queries with LINQPad by Sébastien Finot.

Building Interactive Queries with LINQPad

image6

What you will learn from this book

  • Discover what LINQ can do and how it will help you
  • Learn all about LINQ query operators to join, aggregate, select, and filter data
  • Write LINQ queries with both method and query syntaxes
  • Query databases and remote services using LINQ
  • Create and manipulate XML and in-memory collections
  • Differentiate LINQPad’s query types
  • Handle user input with LINQPad
  • Customize LINQPad to fit your taste or workflow

...

In my usual review style, I'm going to give you my impressions, feelings and thoughts about the book. I'm not going to give you chapter-by-chapter blow-by. That you can get from other reviews and by visiting the book's site...

So let's get started then!

I received the eBook on Thursday and two train rides later I was done. The book has 126 pages, but the first part (ToC, author and reviewer notes, etc) and the index at the end take a percentage of those. That just means the rest is more like condensed soup that just needs your brain juices to reconstitute (hum... not sure where I'm going with that... but it sounded kind of cool...lol). Anyway, I pretty much couldn't put it down.

This book isn't for LINQPad Ninja's. It's not really for LINQ Ninja's either.

It's perfect for those that might not be using LINQ as well as they think they should be. It's perfect for those who think they might not be using LINQPad as effectively as they could. If you're anything like me, doc's and help are a last resort. We install the app and just start clicking. If we can get it doing something, well, we're good. This means through that many times we miss features or don't use the app as well as we could be. This book will help you if you use LINQPad like that...

But more importantly, this book is a great tutorial on LINQ. It's like learning LINQ with LINQPad added as extra flavoring. That said, if you're 100% new to LINQ, I'd get a broader book. But if you're using LINQ a little, or know one or two tricks, this book is a great way to expand your existing LINQ knowledge.

I'm gushing aren't I?

Well when I read a book on one day and use what I've read the next to help me solve a problem and save a number of lines of code... well, that causes me to gush a little.

Oh it's not perfect. There's a couple tip sections repeated. The focus on Linq to SQL, while the linq stuff is great and seeing it work in the utility is really cool, it might give the impression that Linq to SQL is something you should use in your app's. Personally, I wouldn't. It's not that the tech is bad, it's just the tech is dead. Linq to SQL has about zero future.

I'd liked to have seen the "other data sources" expanded on.

But in those two chapters, there's Linq learning going on, and I wouldn't skip them, even if you don't use that tech.

Summary

If you're a LINQ Jedi or your already live in LINQPad, this book might not be for you. Think of this book as a 200 Linq & LINQPad class. So if you're already a 300, 400, 500, then, well you get the picture)

If you're looking for a book to help you improve your existing Linq knowledge, to expand beyond a limited/working use, check out this book.

If you're looking to better use the awesome that is LINQPad, check out this book.

Would I recommend this book to a friend or co-worker, knowing they'd have to pay for it? I think I've been doing just that above... :)

 

Disclosure of Material Connection: I received one or more of the products or services mentioned above for free in the hope that I would mention it on my blog. Regardless, I only recommend products or services I use personally and believe my readers will enjoy. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.

 

Related Past Post XRef:
[Book Review - Preview] "Building Interactive Queries with LINQPad"

Nothing like a little LinqPad fun for a Friday - "Hosting ASP.NET Web API in LinqPad"
Today's LINQPad fun, SelectExcept! (a tip on selecting all the fields, except...)
LINQPad is just for [no, not "breakfast"... ha.. fooled you] LINQ... Using LINQPad to execute code snippets.
.DumpJson() - LINQPad Extension Fun...
Playing with the TFS API via LINQPad (as in using LINQPad to query TFS via the TFS API)
LINQPad +50 - Adding 50 LINQ examples from DevCurry to LINQPad's sample pallet
Since we're talking about LINQPad... StreamInsight v1.2 Driver and samples for LINQPad
Jesse liberates our LINQ'ness - Learning LINQ, from LINQPad to Visual Studio
LINQ[Pad] to Twitter
LINQPad’ing into Dallas - The latest LINQPad now has “Dallas” support baked in.
OData my LINQPad – LINQPad (beta) now supports Data Services/OData (and there’s .Net 4 rev too)
Need an ad-hoc query tool for your Azure data tables? LINQPad to the rescue
This post title made me laugh, “I've Left Query Analyzer Hell For LINQPad Heaven”
LINQPad and the Entity Framework
Getting External with LINQPad – Advanced LINQPad Dimecast (aka part 3 of 3)
Fun with .Dump() in LINQPad – An intermediate level Dimecast for LINQPad
Link to LINQPad – A Dimecast LINQPad Walkthrough
LINQPad - A Free Interactive LINQ to SQL (and others) Utility (Think "SQL Query Analyzer for LINQ")

Thursday, August 01, 2013

[Book Review - Preview] "Building Interactive Queries with LINQPad"

You all know me, a month without LINQPad is a month not well lived...  :P

Anyway... When the team at Packt gave me the opportunity to review Building Interactive Queries with LINQPad by Sébastien Finot I jumped at it.

Received the book this morning and am already 50%... (Got to love the train commute :)  I'll have the final review up this weekend, but the short of it is, this isn't a book just about LINQPad, but instead LINQ + LINQPad. If you're already 100% LINQ Ninja and use every feature of LINQPad already, then this book isn't for you. But if your LINQ skills are not what you think they should be or you'd like to take advantage or more of the features found in LINQPad, well...

Building Interactive Queries with LINQPad

image

What you will learn from this book

  • Discover what LINQ can do and how it will help you
  • Learn all about LINQ query operators to join, aggregate, select, and filter data
  • Write LINQ queries with both method and query syntaxes
  • Query databases and remote services using LINQ
  • Create and manipulate XML and in-memory collections
  • Differentiate LINQPad’s query types
  • Handle user input with LINQPad
  • Customize LINQPad to fit your taste or workflow

In Detail

If you need to interact with databases, XML, in-memory collections, or remote services, LINQ can make your life simpler. The best way to discover LINQ is with the help of LINQPad, a free IDE whose first goal is to make sure that writing and interacting with your LINQ query is fun and easy. More generally, LINQPad is a C#/VB/F# scratchpad that instantly executes any expression, statement block, or program with rich output formatting and a wealth of features.

With Building Interactive Queries with LINQPad, you will quickly learn everything you need to know to start using LINQ. To accelerate your learning curve, you will discover how to use LINQPad and its features to test your queries interactively and experiment with all the options offered by LINQ.

In all probability, you already know C#, but have you had a chance to try out LINQ? Building Interactive Queries with LINQPad will introduce you to everything LINQ can offer and will let you interact with every example in LINQPad, LINQ’s best companion.

You will learn how to build and experiment with interactive queries with this practical guide illustrated with short and detailed code samples. You will also get acquainted with other cool applications of LINQpad such as testing, code snippet generation, and so on, along with a broad approach to LINQ (to object, to SQL, to XML, and so on).

Disclosure of Material Connection: I received one or more of the products or services mentioned above for free in the hope that I would mention it on my blog. Regardless, I only recommend products or services I use personally and believe my readers will enjoy. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.

 

Related Past Post XRef:
Nothing like a little LinqPad fun for a Friday - "Hosting ASP.NET Web API in LinqPad"
Today's LINQPad fun, SelectExcept! (a tip on selecting all the fields, except...)
LINQPad is just for [no, not "breakfast"... ha.. fooled you] LINQ... Using LINQPad to execute code snippets.
.DumpJson() - LINQPad Extension Fun...
Playing with the TFS API via LINQPad (as in using LINQPad to query TFS via the TFS API)
LINQPad +50 - Adding 50 LINQ examples from DevCurry to LINQPad's sample pallet
Since we're talking about LINQPad... StreamInsight v1.2 Driver and samples for LINQPad
Jesse liberates our LINQ'ness - Learning LINQ, from LINQPad to Visual Studio
LINQ[Pad] to Twitter
LINQPad’ing into Dallas - The latest LINQPad now has “Dallas” support baked in.
OData my LINQPad – LINQPad (beta) now supports Data Services/OData (and there’s .Net 4 rev too)
Need an ad-hoc query tool for your Azure data tables? LINQPad to the rescue
This post title made me laugh, “I've Left Query Analyzer Hell For LINQPad Heaven”
LINQPad and the Entity Framework
Getting External with LINQPad – Advanced LINQPad Dimecast (aka part 3 of 3)
Fun with .Dump() in LINQPad – An intermediate level Dimecast for LINQPad
Link to LINQPad – A Dimecast LINQPad Walkthrough
LINQPad - A Free Interactive LINQ to SQL (and others) Utility (Think "SQL Query Analyzer for LINQ")