Showing posts with label MicrosoftOffice. Show all posts
Showing posts with label MicrosoftOffice. Show all posts

Wednesday, July 16, 2014

Using OpenXML to load an Excel Worksheet into a DataTable (or just how different OpenXML is from the old Excel API we're used too)

dotnet thoughts - Read Excel as DataTable using OpenXML and C#

In the current project we were using OpenXML extensively for reading Excel files. Here is the code snippet, which will help you to read / convert Excel files to DataTable.

image

..."

You've heard me whine about how, while OpenXML is cool and how nice it is that we can access Office 2007+ files without Office or third party apps, yet the API is pretty darn different for traditional Office Object Model users? This screenshot shows why... Parts, SharedStringTables, oh my... It's not hard, just takes a while to wrap your head around.

Thursday, July 10, 2014

Two days, "one milliiiioooonnnnn" downloads, the Largest Free Microsoft eBook Collection... ever

Microsoft Senior Sales Excellence Manager - Eric Ligman - Over 1 Million FREE Microsoft eBooks Given Away in 2 days! (and soon to be 2 MILLION!)

When I put my first free eBook post on my blog a couple years ago, people thought I was crazy for wanting to give away one million total books. Sure enough, we did it. Then last year I issued the statement I wanted to give away one million more in ONE WEEK. People thought I had completely lost it then, but you showed them and we achieved our goal. Well, when I put up my “Largest Collection of FREE Microsoft eBooks Ever!” post here on my blog on Monday morning, I once again said “wouldn’t it be fun if we could surpass the 1,000,000 download mark within just one week again?” and sure enough, people questioned my ambition.

I am absolutely THRILLED to see the overwhelming response you have had to the FREE eBook giveaway again this year and I am happy to announce that not only did you hit the ONE MILLION free eBooks downloaded in a week, but you did it in just TWO DAYS! That’s right, you surpassed the ONE MILLION mark within 48 hours of my post first going live! (and what’s even more amazing is that looking at the current download trends, we’ll surpass TWO MILLION free eBooks given away so far this week during the day today!) So not only will you have achieved the original goal of ONE MILLION given away in a week, you’ll have doubled it to TWO MILLION, and there are still several days left in the week since the post first went live on Monday morning. So thank you to all of you for taking advantage of this offer and getting your free Microsoft eBooks! I hope you all find them of value and they are able to help you achieve your learning goals around these topics.

Now one question I get quite a bit is, “What are the most popular eBooks being downloaded?” For fun, I thought I’d pull the stats last night and see where we were....

If you want to see the full list of almost 300 FREE Microsoft eBooks, click here for my original post; otherwise, I give you the Top 60 eBooks being downloaded so far (as of last night):

image..."

Largest collection of FREE Microsoft eBooks ever, including: Windows 8.1, Windows 8, Windows 7, Office 2013, Office 365, Office 2010, SharePoint 2013, Dynamics CRM, PowerShell, Exchange Server, Lync 2013, System Center, Azure, Cloud, SQL Server, and much more

FREE Microsoft eBooks! Who doesn’t love FREE Microsoft eBooks? Well, for the past few years, I’ve provided posts containing almost 150 FREE Microsoft eBooks and my readers, new and existing, have loved these posts so much that they downloaded over 3.5 Million free eBooks as of last June, including over 1,000,000 in a single week last year (and many, many more since then).

Given the amount my readers enjoy these posts and these free resources, I am sharing another post this year with over 130 more FREE eBooks, Step-By-Steps, Resource Guides, etc., for your enjoyment. Plus I’m also including links to the free eBooks I shared in the past so you have all of them here in one single post, making this my single largest collection EVER (Almost 300 total)! ...

..."

I've highlighted Eric's posts a number of times in the past, he's been sharing ebooks for a while, but 1+ million downloads in 2 days is a major milestone. Sure every tech news blog has mentioned his post, still it's a pretty darn impressive stat...

 

Related Past Post XRef:
Microsoft Press [Older] eBook Shelf
Eric Ligman's List of "Free Microsoft Office 365 Resources, Training, Virtual Courses..."
Microsoft Press Free eBooks now have a home in the Microsoft Virtual Academy
Eric triple downs on his Free Microsoft eBook List... (Windows, Visual Studio, SQL Server, Office, Azure and More)
Eric's done it again... ANOTHER large collection of free eBooks and Resource Kits
A Microsoft eBook Bonanza - Office, SQL Server, Development, WinPhone, Career and more
Microsoft Technologies E-Book Gallery (TechNet Wiki)

Thursday, June 26, 2014

Being open to opening OpenXML documents in Visual Studio with the now open source Open XML Package Editor for VS 2012/2013

OpenXML Developer - Open XML Package Editor Released for VS2012 and VS2013

image

Chris Rae recently announced on his blog that we have released a new version of the Open XML Package Editor, which now works on Visual Studio 2012 and 2013!

As anyone knows who has seen any of my screen-casts, the Open XML Package Editor is my go-to tool for opening and editing Open XML documents. It is a vital tool for Open XML Developers. After installing, you can drag and drop Open XML documents onto Visual Studio, navigate through the various parts, open parts for editing in the very excellent XML editor that is in Visual Studio, and modify any relationship in the package. Unfortunately, until this release, you had to keep a copy of Visual Studio 2010 around in order to use the tool, a pain to say the least. Well, no more. Now it works with the latest versions of Visual Studio, and furthermore, we will never get into the situation again where it only works for previous versions of Visual Studio. Since it is open source, you, I, or anyone else can quickly do the port to new versions of VS. It now supports Visio's new VSDX format and has some other minor fixes and enhancements.

We have published the code on GitHub under the Apache 2.0 license. If you just want to download the new version of the Package Editor, it's here on the Visual Studio Gallery. [GD: Post Leached in Full]

We all know that OpenXML documents (DocX, XlxX, PptX, *X, etc, etc) are really just zip file containers with standardize manifests, contents and packaging right? (Don't believe me? Rename a .DocX to .zip and see).
And sure, you can open and spelunk the unzipped contents of the document, it's not the easiest. Instead you've got to use an OpenXML explorer, one like this one, the Open XML Package Editor. And hey you can even stay in your favorite tool of choice (Visual Studio of course!). And now that it's open source, it's even cooler!

 

Related Past Post XRef:
Open Sesame - Open XML SDK is now open source

Using OpenXML SDK to generate Word documents via templates (and without Word being installed)
Checking for Microsoft Word DocX/DocM Revisions/Track Changes without using Word... (via OpenXML SDK, LINQ to XML or XML DOM)
LINQ to XlsX... Using VB.Net, LINQ, the OpenXML SDK and a little C# helper, to query an Excel XlsX
Using native OpenXML to create an XlsX (Which provides an example of why I highlight tools that make OpenXML easier...)
Generating Xlsx's on the Server? You're using OpenXML, right? With help from the PowerTools for OpenXML?

Official boat-load, as in supertanker, sized OpenXML content list (Insert "One OpenXML content list to rule them all" here)
So how do I get from here to OpenXML? Got a map for you, an Open XML SDK Blog Map…
Where to go to scratch your OpenXML dev info itch…
"Open XML Explained" Free eBook (PDF)
The Noob's Guide to Open XML Dev (If you know how to spell OpenXML but that's about it, this is your Getting Started guide...)

Reusing the PowerShell PowerTools for Open XML in your C# or VB.Net world
PowerShell, OpenXML, WMI and the PowerTools for OpenXML = Doc generation for our inner geek
Because it’s a PowerShell kind of day… PowerTools for Open XML V1.1 Released
OpenXML PowerTools updated – Cell your Excel via PowerShell
Powering into OpenXML with PowerShell

Open XML SDK 2.0 for Microsoft Office Released – Automate Office documents without Office

Open XML 2.0 Code Snippets for VS2010 (and VS2008 too)
Open XML Format SDK 2.0 Code Snippets for Visual Studio 2008 – 52 C#/VB Code Snippets to help ease your Open XML coding
Open XML File Format Code Snippets for Visual Studio 2005 (Office 2007 NOT required)

Open XML SDK v1 Released

OpenXML Viewer 1.0 Released – Open source DocX to HTML conversion, with IE, Firefox and Opera (and/or command line) support

Wednesday, June 25, 2014

Open Sesame - Open XML SDK is now open source

Open XML SDK goes open source

Brian Jones is the principal GPM of the Office Development Platform.

Today is an exciting day for Office developers—we’re open sourcing the Open XML SDK on GitHub! We’re eager to work with the community on continual improvements to the SDK’s functionality and scalability, and to explore new platforms and technologies to support developer platforms such as Mono, an open source implementation of .NET Framework. It’s been over seven years since we released the initial preview of the Open XML SDK, and over that time it’s been one of the key tools developers have used for building solutions that consume, create, and modify Office documents.

I encourage you to head over to GitHub and take a look at the project. We’d love your participation! We posted it under the .NET Foundation. In addition to the SDK itself, we opened all of the Open XML conceptual documentation in MSDN for public review/contributions. A living copy of the docs is now in GitHub for you to edit and review. Pull requests welcome!

The Open XML SDK is a key piece of our overall developer platform. The trends around mobile apps connected to the cloud have expanded the role that Office documents can play in solutions. Many of our Fortune 100 customers have built solutions leveraging the SDK, especially in the banking and health care sectors. We average over 10,000 downloads a month, and the SDK is also widely distributed in other software packages, such as accounting tools.

...

In another post, we provided a great drilldown into the architecture of the SDK and a ton of great examples.

As you’ve probably noticed lately, we’re making a big push to open a lot of our developer technologies to the community. We have a few really cool projects already in GitHub, like the Office 365 SDK for Android Preview, as well as the Open XML package editor. We’ve shifted the Office extensibility model to use open standards like HTML and JavaScript, and we’re exposing Office 365 data (documents, mail, and calendars) through RESTful APIs leveraging oAuth. You’ll see us continue to do more of this, and we’d love to hear any feedback you might have on our UserVoice.

If you’re already an Open XML developer, this is definitely an exciting day. If you haven’t built solutions yet on Open XML, I strongly encourage you to go take a look and try out some of the examples. You’ll be surprised by what you can build.

image..."

The Microsoft open source wagon just keeps on rolling! The OpenXML spec has been open for a while and now the SDK is too. Heck I wonder what else is going to be opened up? The Fluid UI? Windows Live Writer (please, please, please)? Guess 2014 is going to officially be "The Year Microsoft Opened"...

 

Related Past Post XRef:

Using OpenXML SDK to generate Word documents via templates (and without Word being installed)
Checking for Microsoft Word DocX/DocM Revisions/Track Changes without using Word... (via OpenXML SDK, LINQ to XML or XML DOM)
LINQ to XlsX... Using VB.Net, LINQ, the OpenXML SDK and a little C# helper, to query an Excel XlsX
Using native OpenXML to create an XlsX (Which provides an example of why I highlight tools that make OpenXML easier...)
Generating Xlsx's on the Server? You're using OpenXML, right? With help from the PowerTools for OpenXML?

Official boat-load, as in supertanker, sized OpenXML content list (Insert "One OpenXML content list to rule them all" here)
So how do I get from here to OpenXML? Got a map for you, an Open XML SDK Blog Map…
Where to go to scratch your OpenXML dev info itch…
"Open XML Explained" Free eBook (PDF)
The Noob's Guide to Open XML Dev (If you know how to spell OpenXML but that's about it, this is your Getting Started guide...)

Reusing the PowerShell PowerTools for Open XML in your C# or VB.Net world
PowerShell, OpenXML, WMI and the PowerTools for OpenXML = Doc generation for our inner geek
Because it’s a PowerShell kind of day… PowerTools for Open XML V1.1 Released
OpenXML PowerTools updated – Cell your Excel via PowerShell
Powering into OpenXML with PowerShell

Open XML SDK 2.0 for Microsoft Office Released – Automate Office documents without Office

Open XML 2.0 Code Snippets for VS2010 (and VS2008 too)
Open XML Format SDK 2.0 Code Snippets for Visual Studio 2008 – 52 C#/VB Code Snippets to help ease your Open XML coding
Open XML File Format Code Snippets for Visual Studio 2005 (Office 2007 NOT required)

Open XML SDK v1 Released

OpenXML Viewer 1.0 Released – Open source DocX to HTML conversion, with IE, Firefox and Opera (and/or command line) support

Saturday, May 17, 2014

Play with a demo of the new Microsoft Azure RemoteApp right now...

In the Cloud - Microsoft Azure RemoteApp Demo

At TechEd this week, I had the privilege to announce the release of Microsoft Azure RemoteApp preview, a new service from Microsoft that provides Windows applications from a finished Azure service.

Since the launch of the preview, the team also enabled an Azure RemoteApp demo that allows you to experience the end-user aspects of the service on your choice of iOS, MacOS, or Windows devices in less than 5 clicks.

There are already thousands of unique users testing the service, and the team is working hard to increase the capacity.  The demand has been so high that it is, understandably, taking us time to go through all the approvals.  But don’t worry – we’ll get to everyone (we already have thousands of cores allocated to supporting this preview).

To experience the demo for yourself, click here.  Also, to read more about the demo experience, the RDS team has written a detailed post about the preview.

...

This demo lets you play with just released RemoteApp feature right now, with hardly any setup. Just install the RemoteApp utility and go! It's really pretty neat and the hybrid scenario is  something I'm going to have to take a good look at.

image

image

image

Wednesday, May 07, 2014

Visual Studio Image Library updated, now includes VS 2013 style and is now over 10,000+ images

Microsoft Downloads - Visual Studio Image Library

The Visual Studio Image Library contains application images that appear in Microsoft Visual Studio, Microsoft Windows, the Office system and other Microsoft software.

image

The Visual Studio Image Library contains application images that appear in Microsoft Visual Studio, Microsoft Windows, the Office system and other Microsoft software. The libraries for both Visual Studio 2012 and Visual Studio 2013 are available and each library contains over 5,000 images which can be used to create applications that look visually consistent with Microsoft software

image

SNAGHTMLf91e0c

SNAGHTMLf991d4

Something every developer needs... Don't spelunk the EXE or DLL for image resources, just grab this...

 

Related Past Post XRef:
Visual Studio 2012 Image Library - 5,000+ images downloadable now... (Think, flat "modern" images...)

Monday, April 28, 2014

One Idea to OneNote in three hours... Zapier’s Journey

OneNote Dev Blog - Zapier’s OneNote Integration Journey

We are thrilled to have our first guest post on our blog! The following is post from Bryan Helmig of Zapier, who is launching their new OneNote app on Zapier today.


It was right before lunch when we learned that OneNote was launching their API. Naturally, we were very excited about the prospect of quickly bringing OneNote to our user base, though we had one obvious problem: we had never seen their API before!

Here's how we acted on our excitement that day and within three hours integrated OneNote to Zapier:

The first stop was the OneNote Dev Center, where I began by looking for keywords that would clue me in on the style of API, luckily I spotted some references to REST and OAuth. While we work with hundreds of different flavored APIs at Zapier, common patterns like REST and OAuth make our lives very easy.

Within 10 minutes, I had a pretty good understanding of what the OneNote API could do, how we'd authenticate it and how we'd utilize it. The Dev Center contains some particularly good pages, all enumerated in the wonderful how to section.

Next, I created a OneNote app inside the Zapier Developer Platform and started configuring it according to the OneNote API documentation. Let's cover the basics:

Authenticating

...

But that isn't all, you can utilize multipart/form-data with other different embeddable content types like images. You can read about this in more detail here.

We used this most basic of patterns to expand into other actions like pulling down HTML from URLs to create an auto-snipper, inserting an image URL into a normal note with img tags, or wrapping up some normal text content into some valid HTML.

Each variation took maybe 15-20 minutes to build and test, but in the end we had a pretty robust little app that was very painless to develop!

Launch!

A mere 3 hours after learning of the OneNote API, we were able to launch our OneNote integration, which is a testament to a knockout

image

I love these kinds of behind-baseball posts, especially when it comes from a third party who lives integration...

Like I've said before, I wonder if the opening of OneNote isn't one of the bellwether moments, where you, your ideas and their API you take it to places never even envisioned or dreamed of by the team. For example, I wonder if I couldn't use a public read-only Notebook in place of, or as an addendum to, my blog. There are clients everywhere, sync is baked in, there's offline editing, rich editor, etc. If there were some kind of ad support, visit counting and commenting (cough... well maybe that's very optional... lol) I think we'd be close. Even without that, I'm still thinking about it... hum...

Monday, April 21, 2014

Mixing up your PowerPoint training with Office Mix, your PowerPoint - > Interactive Training Tool

Kurt Shintaku's Blog - BETA: “Office Mix” – Turn PowerPoints into Interactive Training\

What does MIX do?
The short answer? It makes your life a lot easier. ...

NOTE: Registration requires an invitation.  If you do not have one, you can request an invitation at http://aka.ms/mixconnect.

What does Office Mix do?

...

The “I-need-a-little-more-detail” answer? Office Mix allows you to turn your PowerPoints into interactive online lessons or presentations. We install an add-in that gives you the ability to record audio, video, and handwriting, and insert interactive elements like quizzes and CK12 exercises. There’s even a screen capture tool so you can record anything on your PC.

Once your presentation is ready just click “Create Mix.” We work our magic to mix it into an interactive document complete with analytics, and place it in the cloud. From there, just share the link, and your students can watch it on just about any device with a web browser. You can then check student progress online and see who watched the presentation, and how they did on your quizzes. 

How much does Office Mix cost?

Are you ready for this? It’s free! The website, data analytics, and add-in are all free. Office Mix does, however, require Office 2013. You can try Office for free if you don’t have the latest version.

mix.office.com

image

This is a new Microsoft.. A "Sign-in with Google?" This is first time I think I've seen that on a Microsoft product/service like this (I think ;)

Anyway... With all the interactive features in PowerPoint, and the fact that how many more can you really add, this looks like a smart way to extend it and give it more life.

Tuesday, March 25, 2014

Word For Windows 1.1a and Early MS-DOS Source Available (Really)

The Official Microsoft Blog - Microsoft makes source code for MS-DOS and Word for Windows available to public

image

On Tuesday, we dusted off the source code for early versions of MS-DOS and Word for Windows. With the help of the Computer History Museum, we are making this code available to the public for the first time.

The museum has done an excellent job of curating some of the most significant historical software programs in computing history. As part of this ongoing project, the museum will make available two of the most widely used software programs of the 1980’s, MS DOS 1.1 and 2.0 and Microsoft Word for Windows 1.1a, to help future generations of technologists better understand the roots of personal computing.

In 1980, IBM approached Microsoft to work on a project code-named “Chess.”...

...

It’s mind-boggling to think of the growth from those days when Microsoft had under 100 employees and a Microsoft product (MS-DOS) had less than 300KB (yes, kilobytes) of source code. From those roots we’ve grown in a few short decades to become a company that has sold more than 200 million licenses of Windows 8 and has over 1 billion people using Microsoft Office. Great things come from modest beginnings, and the great Microsoft devices and services of the future will probably start small, just as MS-DOS and Word for Windows did.

Thanks to the Computer History Museum, these important pieces of source code will be preserved and made available to the community for historical and technical scholarship.

Computer History Museum - Computer History Museum Makes Historic MS-DOS and Word for Windows Source Code Available to the Public

Mountain View, Ca—March 25, 2014— The Computer History Museum (CHM) announced today that it has, with permission from Microsoft Corporation, made available original source code for two historic programs: MS-DOS, the 1982 "Disk Operating System" for IBM-compatible personal computers, and Word for Windows, the 1990 Windows-based version of their word processor.

IBM went outside the company for many hardware and software components of their 1981 personal computer. Though most vendors were kept in the dark about the project, code-named “Chess,” IBM developed a unique relationship between their Boca Raton-based team and Microsoft, then a small company based in Seattle.

Microsoft, which was providing the BASIC language interpreter, agreed to also supply an operating system. Without their own operating system already in place, they licensed a product from nearby Seattle Computer Products and worked closely with IBM to make the changes they wanted. It shipped as "PC-DOS" for IBM and "MS-DOS" for other PC manufacturers. We are today releasing the source code of MS-DOS version 1.1 from 1982, and of version 2.0 from 1983.

"Version 1.1 fits an entire operating system – limited as it was – into only 12K bytes of memory, which is tiny compared to today's software," said Len Shustek, CHM Chairman.

Microsoft's DOS-based version of Word, first released in 1983, was not a success against the dominant word processor of that era, WordPerfect. The 1989 release of Word for Windows changed all that: within four years it was generating over half the worldwide word processing market revenue. It was a remarkable marketing and engineering achievement. We are today revealing the technical magic by releasing the source code to version 1.1a of Word for Windows.

“MS-DOS and Word for Windows built the foundation for Microsoft’s success in the technology industry,” said Roy Levin, distinguished engineer and managing director, Microsoft Research. “By contributing these source codes to the Computer History Museum archives, Microsoft is making these historic systems from the early era of personal computing available to the community for historical and technical scholarship.”

"We think preserving historic source code like these two programs is key to understanding how software has evolved from primitive roots to become a crucial part of our civilization,” says Shustek.

For a blog posting surrounding the release of this source code, please visit:

http://www.computerhistory.org/atchm/microsoft-ms-dos-early-source-code

http://www.computerhistory.org/atchm/microsoft-word-for-windows-1-1a-source-code

..."

These links don't appear to be working as I write this... I hope this isn't an early April Fools thing...

Okay, the links appear to be working now... kind of. Think they are being slammed.

Monday, March 17, 2014

Eric Ligman's List of "Free Microsoft Office 365 Resources, Training, Virtual Courses..."

Microsoft Sales Excellence Manager - Eric Ligman - How To Get Free Microsoft Office 365 Resources, Training, Virtual Courses, and More

Microsoft Office 365 provides a cloud-based service that enables individuals and businesses to accomplish the tasks they want to, where they want to, when they want to, all with the familiar Microsoft Office platform they’ve been using for years. By enabling this experience across devices, both in the cloud and offline, it lets people accomplish more, easier, in a much more efficient way. Whether you are new to Microsoft Office 365 or have been using it for awhile, I thought I would let you know about many free resources we have available to you from Microsoft to help you get the most out of your Microsoft Office 365 subscription.

What’s New – Find out what’s New for each of the Microsoft Office 2013 applications you get with Microsoft Office 365:

Quick Start Guides

Microsoft Virtual Academy Sessions

Free eBooks

Video Sessions

Are you a U.S. Microsoft Partner?

Support -

image

You've been hearing allot about Office 365 recently. If you're new to it, here's a bunch of great resources to help get you up to speed quickly... and cheaply... :)

Thursday, March 13, 2014

Head Shrinking in Outlook... (As in using the new Outlook 2013 SP1 Compact Header Display...)

Office Blogs - Compact message header in Outlook 2013

We are excited to announce that we’ve taken all the feedback we’ve received and used it to design a compact version of the email message header in Outlook 2013. The new message header gives you control over the header information you see, so that you can concentrate on what matters most: the content of the message. We really like it, and we think you will too.

Expanded or collapsed? You decide.

We’ve made it incredibly simple. You can decide which view of the message header you like. Do you want to show the traditional header? Or do you want to focus on message content and get rid of excess chrome? You can switch between displays with just a click.

image

  • Is that all it does? ...
  • Sometimes my reading pane is really, narrow. What happens then? ...
  • How do I see all the To and Cc information? ...
  • Continue to stay connected with the people that matter most. ...

...

Q. When will compact message header in Outlook 2013 be available?

A. Compact message header in Outlook 2013 is available as part of last month’s updates for Office 365 subscribers as well as Office 2013 Service Pack 1.

This is another of those things you might not ever see unless your shown or told about it. I have a Mostly love-Little Hate relationship with Outlook 2013, but while this doesn't tip the balance either way, it is kind of cool, especially on my 13" notebook display where every pixel counts.

Wednesday, February 26, 2014

I see data visualizations... Power BI, Power Map and Power Q&A [Oh my]

SQL Server Blog - Data Visualizations

A couple of weeks back was a really exciting time for us. Less than a year after we released Office 365 for Businesses, we announced the general availability of Power BI for Office 365. You may have read previous blog articles by Quentin Clark on Making Big Data Work for Everyone and Kamal Hathi on Simplifying Business Intelligence through Power BI for Office 365. In this article, we’ll outline how we think about visualizations.

Why Visualizations Matter

While a list of items is great for entering or auditing data, data visualizations are a great way to distill information to what matters most that is understandable quickly.

...

Visualizations in Productivity Apps

We have the privilege of having the largest community of users of productivity applications in the world. Thanks...

...

Faster Creation of Visualizations

Excel 2007 introduced the ability to set the style of a chart with one click and leverage richer graphics such as shadows, anti-aliased lines, and transparency.

Office 2013 was one of our most ground-breaking releases.

...

Richer Interactivity

Part of my role at Microsoft involves presenting on various topics to stakeholders, and increasingly most of these include data visualizations. Only a few years back, I remember ...

...

Visualizations on All Data

In addition, both data volumes and the types of data customers want to visualize have expanded as well.

Excel 2013 also introduced the Data Model, opening the door for workbooks that contained significantly larger datasets than before, with richer way to express business logic directly within the workbook.

Increasingly, we have access to geospatial data, and recently introduced Power Map brings new 3D visualization tool for mapping, exploring, and interacting with geographical and temporal data to Excel, enabling people to discover and share new insights such as trends, patterns, and outliers in their data over time...

...

We are very excited to have introduced Power Q&A as part of the Power BI launch. This innovative experience makes it even easier to understand your data by providing a natural language experience that interprets your question and immediately serves up the correct answer on the fly in the form of an interactive chart or graph. These visualizations change dynamically as you modify the question, creating a truly interactive experience with your data.

image

...

image

Visualizations Everywhere

As customers are creating insights and sharing them, we have also invested in ensuring SharePoint 2013 and Office 365 provide full fidelity rendering as the desktop client so their products remain beautiful wherever it’s consumed.

What’s Next?

..."

The Power Q&A looks interesting. I'd love to be able to provide that kind of thing in my apps. But lets see how it plays out over a version or two...

 

Related Past Post XRef:
Going with the GeoFlow for Excel 2013... Free 3D visualization add-in for mapping, exploring, and interacting with geographical/temporal data

Friday, February 21, 2014

Microsoft Open Specifications Posters v2 released (Think "Wow, that's allot of spec's" Posters)

Microsoft Downloads - Open Specifications Posters

The Open Specifications Posters (PDF format) make it easy for interoperability developers to explore the Open Specifications overview documents for Office client, Lync, SharePoint, Office file formats, Exchange Server, SQL Server, and Windows.

Version: 5.0

Date Published: 2/21/2014

ExchangeOpenSpecPoster.pdf, 556 KB

MicrosoftOpenSpecPoster - Accessiblility Version.pdf, 336 KB

OfficeLyncOpenSpecPoster.pdf, 669 KB

SharePointOpenSpecPoster.pdf, 606 KB

SQLOpenSpecPoster.pdf, 1,011 KB

WindowsOpenSpecPoster.pdf, 1.0 MB

The Open Specifications Posters (PDF format) make it easy for interoperability developers to explore the Open Specifications overview documents for Office client, Lync, SharePoint, Office file formats, Exchange Server, SQL Server, and Windows. The posters display, by functional area, the protocols, file formats, and related technologies, as described in each overview document. A high-contrast poster is also provided for those with visual accessibility needs that contains listings for all functional areas .

Some cube art to help when you get visited by the "Microsoft is closed and the devil" guy (I know you know that guy...)

Here's a snap of the Windows PDF;

imageSNAGHTML1fe1a2a9

 

Related Past Post XRef:
Office/Exchange File Format,Specification and Protocol Documentation refreshed
Microsoft Format and Specification Documentation 0712 Refresh (Think Office 2013 CP update). Oh and some SharePoint Doc's too
Microsoft Format and Specification Documentation Refresh ("Significantly changed technical content") [Updated: Includes updates for Office 15 Technical Preview ]
Microsoft Office File Formats and Microsoft Office Protocols Documentation Refreshed
Microsoft Office File Formats and Protocols documentation updated for Office 2010 (Think “Now with added ‘X’ flavor… DocX, PptX, XlsX, etc”)

Microsoft Open Specifications Poster

XAML Language Specification (as in the in the full XAML, WPF and Silverlight XAML Specs)

"Microsoft SQL Server Data Portability Documentation"

MS-PST file format specification released. Yep, the full and complete specification for Outlook PST’s is now just a download away.
Microsoft Office (DOC, XLS, PPT) Binary File Format Specifications Released – We’re talking the full technical specification… (The [MS-DOC].pdf alone is 553 pages of very dense specification information)
DOC, XLS and PPT Binary File Format Specifications Released (plus WMF, Windows Compound File [aka OLE 2.0 Structured Storage] and Ink Serialized Format Specifications and Translator to XML news)

Thursday, January 30, 2014

Window-Eyes - Free (as in free) screen-reading software from Microsoft and GW Micro

Microsoft UK Health Blog - Free screen-reading software for the visually impaired offered by Microsoft and GW Micro

Accessing technology is a special challenge for millions of people who are blind or visually impaired. Imagine the difficulty of trying to use common productivity programs with limited vision – or the frustration of being unable to use them at all due to blindness. Microsoft and GW Micro are working together to make the benefits of technology more available in hospitals, offices, schools and homes around the world. Anyone using Microsoft Office 2010 or later can now download GW Micro’s popular Window-Eyes software for free. The software is also available for free to Office 365 customers who install an Office client on their machine.

The Windows Eyes software makes programs with graphic interfaces accessible by reading what appears on the screen to the user. The software offers narration in more than 15 languages, allowing it to improve access to technology for millions of people around the world.

Thousands of Microsoft Office users have already downloaded free copies of Windows-Eyes. Join them today – and be sure to check out all other initiatives Microsoft is pursuing to make technology more accessible to everyone.  [Post Leached in Full]

Windows-Eyes for Office

GW Micro, in collaboration with Microsoft, is excited to provide people who are blind, visually impaired, or print disabled with a completely functional* and free license of GW Micro's Window-Eyes screen reader. Microsoft is offering customers who have a licensed** version of Office 2010 or later the ability to download Window-Eyes, a screen reader for Windows PCs, free of charge.

If you are ready to get started, select your preferred language and activate the Download Now button.

Key Features

Supported Operating Systems: Windows 8.1, Windows 8, Windows 7, Windows Vista, Windows XP

Supported Windows Servers: 2012, 2008 R2, 2008, 2003

Available in multiple languages

Compatible with Microsoft Office 2010 and 2013

image

While luckily neither myself or my family needs this, I still think this is easily worth highlighting and sharing.

Thursday, December 05, 2013

Free Export DataSet/DataTable/List<t> to Excel (without using or even having Excel installed)

Code Project - A free "Export to Excel" C# class, using OpenXML

It's amazing that even now, in 2013, there are so many developers still asking for help on how to write C# and VB.Net code, to export their data to Excel.

Even worse, a lot of them will stumble on articles suggesting that they should write their data to a comma-separated file, but to give the file an .xls extension.

So, today, I'm going to walkthrough how to use my C# "Export to Excel" class, which you can add to your C# WinForms / WPF / ASP.Net application, using one line of code.

Depending on whether your data is stored in a DataSet, DataTable or List<>, you simply need to call one of these three functions, and tell them what (Excel) filename you want to write to.

  • public static bool CreateExcelDocument<T>(List<T> list, string ExcelFilename
  • public static bool CreateExcelDocument(DataTable dt, string ExcelFilename
  • public static bool CreateExcelDocument(DataSet ds, string ExcelFilename)

...

And that's all you have to do. The CreateExcelDocument function will create a "real" Excel file for you.

For example, if you had a created a DataSet containing three DataTables called

  • Drivers
  • Vehicles,
  • Vehicle Owners,

..then here's what your Excel file would look like. The class would create one worksheet per DataTable, and each worksheet would contain the data from that DataTable.

image

...

Look, friends don't let friends use Office InterOp... (omg, especially for server/automated ops!). There are any number of options now available, many free or reasonably priced. Just... don't.... do... it...

Thursday, November 21, 2013

Office/Exchange File Format,Specification and Protocol Documentation refreshed

Microsoft Office File Formats Documentation

The Microsoft Office file formats documentation provides detailed technical specifications for Microsoft proprietary file formats.

The documentation includes a set of companion overview and reference documents that supplement the technical specifications with conceptual background, overviews of file format relationships and interactions, and technical reference information.

Version:
Date Published:

1113

11/20/2013

File name:
File size:

OfficeFileFormatsProtocols.zip

70.8 MB

[[ReadmefirstOffFileFormat]].pdf

137 KB

[MS-CTDOC].pdf

356 KB

[MS-CTXLS].pdf

419 KB

[MS-DOC].pdf

19.1 MB

[MS-DSEXPORT].pdf

485 KB

[MS-FFCHGTR].pdf

139 KB

[MS-ODCFF].pdf

840 KB

[MS-ODRAW].pdf

23.3 MB

[MS-OFCGLOS].pdf

1.6 MB

[MS-OFFCRYPTO].pdf

2.8 MB

[MS-OFFDI].pdf

766 KB

[MS-OFORMS].pdf

5.9 MB

[MS-OFREF].pdf

1.4 MB

[MS-OGRAPH].pdf

5.9 MB

[MS-ONE].pdf

3.1 MB

[MS-ONESTORE].pdf

3.5 MB

[MS-OSHARED].pdf

6.3 MB

[MS-OVBA].pdf

2.9 MB

[MS-OWEMXML].pdf

1.1 MB

[MS-PPT].pdf

23.3 MB

[MS-PST].pdf

5.7 MB

[MS-WORDLFF].pdf

599 KB

[MS-XLDM].pdf

3.8 MB

[MS-XLS].pdf

41.5 MB

[MS-XLSB].pdf

41.1 MB

Microsoft Office Protocol Documentation

The Office protocol documentation provides detailed technical specifications for Microsoft proprietary protocols (including extensions to industry-standard or other published protocols) that are implemented and used in Microsoft Office client programs to interoperate or communicate with Microsoft products.

The documentation includes a set of companion overview and reference documents that supplement the technical specifications with conceptual background, overviews of inter-protocol relationships and interactions, and technical reference information.

Version:
Date Published:

1113

11/20/2013

File name:
File size:

OfficeProto.zip

59.4 MB

[[ReadmefirstOffProto]].pdf

147 KB

[MS-ABS].pdf

2.5 MB

[MS-AVEDGEA].pdf

916 KB

[MS-CONFAS].pdf

1,009 KB

Word, Excel, and PowerPoint Standards Support

This documentation provides detailed support information for the Open Document Format (ODF) and Open XML (ECMA-376 and ISO/IEC-29500) file formats implemented in Microsoft Word, Microsoft Excel, and Microsoft PowerPoint.

Version:
Date Published:

1113

11/20/2013

File name:
File size:

MSOFFSTAND.zip

38.8 MB

[[ReadmefirstOStand]].pdf

140 KB

[MS-CUSTOMUI].pdf

11.1 MB

[MS-CUSTOMUI2].pdf

3.3 MB

[MS-DOCX].pdf

2.4 MB

Microsoft Exchange and Microsoft Outlook Standards Documentation

The Microsoft Exchange and Microsoft Outlook standards documentation describes how Exchange and Outlook support industry messaging standards and Requests for Comments (RFCs) documents about iCalendar, Internet Message Access Protocol – Version 4 (IMAP4), and Post Office Protocol – Version 3 (POP3).

 

Version:
Date Published:

17.0

11/20/2013

File name:
File size:

Exchange_Standards.zip

4.0 MB

[[ReadmefirstMSExStand]].pdf

143 KB

[MS-OXGLOS].pdf

668 KB

[MS-OXREF].pdf

710 KB

[MS-STANOICAL].pdf

2.3 MB

That's some lite reading for the coming holidays... :)

 

Related Past Post XRef:
Microsoft Format and Specification Documentation 0712 Refresh (Think Office 2013 CP update). Oh and some SharePoint Doc's too
Microsoft Format and Specification Documentation Refresh ("Significantly changed technical content") [Updated: Includes updates for Office 15 Technical Preview ]
Microsoft Office File Formats and Microsoft Office Protocols Documentation Refreshed
Microsoft Office File Formats and Protocols documentation updated for Office 2010 (Think “Now with added ‘X’ flavor… DocX, PptX, XlsX, etc”)

Microsoft Open Specifications Poster

XAML Language Specification (as in the in the full XAML, WPF and Silverlight XAML Specs)

"Microsoft SQL Server Data Portability Documentation"

MS-PST file format specification released. Yep, the full and complete specification for Outlook PST’s is now just a download away.
Microsoft Office (DOC, XLS, PPT) Binary File Format Specifications Released – We’re talking the full technical specification… (The [MS-DOC].pdf alone is 553 pages of very dense specification information)
DOC, XLS and PPT Binary File Format Specifications Released (plus WMF, Windows Compound File [aka OLE 2.0 Structured Storage] and Ink Serialized Format Specifications and Translator to XML news)