Showing posts with label F#. Show all posts
Showing posts with label F#. Show all posts

Wednesday, February 26, 2014

F# for your favorite VB'er

Phil Trelford's Array - F# Eye for the VB Guy

Are you a VB developer curious about functional-first programming. F# is a statically typed language built into Visual Studio. It is a multi-paradigm language with both functional and object-oriented constructs.

F# has powerful type inference which reduces the amount of typing you need to do without reducing performance or correctness.

F# projects are easily referenced from VB and vice versa. Like VB, F# makes minimal use of curly braces, and for many operations the syntax will feel quite familiar.

Here’s my cut-out-and-keep guide to common operations in both languages:

...

SNAGHTML6776995

image

Great little side-by-side for that little VB'er that's in your heart (you know it, you still look back at your VB times with a little longing...)

Monday, January 27, 2014

SharpDevelop 5 goes MIT and Beta 1 too!

SharpDevelop Community - Christoph Wille - License Change for SharpDevelop 5

With commit hash 1300bac39c (corresponding to build number 5.0.0.3652, our Beta 1 release) we have switched the license for SharpDevelop from LGPL to MIT. (SharpDevelop 4.x and older remain LGPL licensed)

This means one very important thing: You can use our source code in your projects (not only the assemblies).

As a user of SharpDevelop, nothing really changes. You still can build applications of any license flavor.

...

SharpDevelop Community - Christoph Wille - SharpDevelop 5 Beta 1 Available

Finally.(Download)

It has been (too) long in the making, but our major rearchitecting of SharpDevelop is close to being done, with only a few functional areas not in this Beta release:

  • EnvDTE.FileCodeModel is missing, thus our custom NuGet packages will be broken (T4MVC, MVCScaffolding and EF)
  • Code Quality Analysis and SharpDevelop Reports are missing (due to a rewrite of SDR)

Please note that Beta 2 is not too far off, and these will be in Beta 2.

As pointed out in the blog post SharpDevelop 5 C# Tech Preview, we are still shipping with C# only in SharpDevelop 5 – and this will most likely remain true for RTM too. (VB.NET will compile, but it won’t have code completion nor refactoring) SharpDevelop 5 installs in parallel to older versions, and if you have the patience: give it a dry run with a copy of an existing project (at least backup and/or use source control before you let a beta IDE touch your source code).

For further information on what’s new, please consult this list of select blog posts from the team members (I'll be doing a few "What's New" blog posts in the coming days, because obviously these are only a few big-ticket items - check back!):

...

image

It's darn nice to see SharpDevelop still kicking. I've been following them for about 10 years, imagine the projects that have come and gone in that time, so seeing that this has stood the test of time, let alone improved with age like a fine wine... well that makes this a happy Monday indeed!

 

Related Past Post XRef:
SharpDevelop gets T4 support
NuGet isn’t just for Visual Studio anymore… NuGet coming soon to SharpDevelop
NuGet your Avalon (SharpDevelop’s AvalonEdit and ICSharpCode.TextEditor, plus samples, are now available via NuGet)
SharpDevelop (aka #develop) 3.0 RTM’s
SharpDevelop for Applications (SDA)
Web Development with SharpDevelop, Web Matrix, and DBGCLR
SourceForge.net: #develop 1.0.2a stopgap release
SourceForge.net: #develop 1.0.2 available for download
SharpDevelop 1.0 Released

Sunday, November 04, 2012

Getting sharp with F# with the free "F# Succinctly" eBook [reg-ware]

Syncfusion  - F# Succinctly

Syncfusion and functional programming enthusiast Robert Pickering bring you F# Succinctly, your quick-start guide to the F# programming language. Starting with the classic "Hello World" program and the basics of identifiers, recursion, and operators, and working through to graphics, simulations, and interactive forms, this book is the ideal first step to becoming a fluent F# programmer. F#'s integration with Visual Studio—featuring IntelliSense expression completion and an interactive version of the language for dynamic code evaluation—makes it the go-to functional language of the .NET platform.

Table of Contents

  1. Introduction
  2. First Steps in F#
  3. Functional Programming
  4. Types and Type Inference
  5. Object-Oriented Programming
  6. Simulations and Graphics
  7. Form User Interaction
  8. Creating an Application

Here's my usual snaps from the PDF. Note that as always, there's also a mobi version available too...

imageimage

 

So what is the story behind all the Succinctly books? Here's a snip;

Staying on the cutting edge
As many of you may know, Syncfusion is a provider of software components for the Microsoft platform. This puts us in the exciting but challenging position of always being on the cutting edge.

Whenever platforms or tools are shipping out of Microsoft, which seems to be about every other week these days, we have to educate ourselves, quickly. Information is plentiful but harder to digest In reality, this translates into a lot of book orders, blog searches, and Twitter scans.

While more information is becoming available on the Internet and more and more books are being published, even on topics that are relatively new, one aspect that continues to inhibit us is the inability to find concise technology overview books.

We are usually faced with two options: read several 500+ page books or scour the web for relevant blog posts and other articles. Just as everyone else who has a job to do and customers to serve, we find this quite frustrating.

The Succinctly series
This frustration translated into a deep desire to produce a series of concise technical books that would be targeted at developers working on the Microsoft platform. We firmly believe, given the background knowledge such developers have, that most topics can be translated into books that are between 50 and 100 pages. This is exactly what we resolved to accomplish with the Succinctly series. Isn’t everything wonderful born out of a deep desire to change things for the better?

The best authors, the best content
Each author was carefully chosen from a pool of talented experts who shared our vision. The book you now hold in your hands, and the others available in this series, are a result of the authors’ tireless work. You will find original content that is guaranteed to get you up and running in about the time it takes to drink a few cups of coffee.

Free forever
Syncfusion will be working to produce books on several topics. The books will always be free. Any updates we publish will also be free.

Free? What is the catch?
There is no catch here. Syncfusion has a vested interest in this effort. As a component vendor, our unique claim has always been that we offer deeper and broader frameworks than anyone else on the market. Developer education greatly helps us market and sell against competing vendors who promise to “enable AJAX support with one click,” or “turn the moon to cheese!”

Let us know what you think
If you have any topics of interest, thoughts, or feedback, please feel free to send them to us at succinctly-series@syncfusion.com.

We sincerely hope you enjoy reading this book and that it helps you better understand the topic of study. Thank you for reading.

This is a gem that might have been lost the recent news flood... If you're always wondered what this F# thing is and how you might get started, this ebook looks like what you've been looking for...

 

Related Past Post XRef:
Syncfusion helps shed a little succinct light on LightSwitch with "LightSwitch Succinctly" (Reg-ware)
"JavaScript Succinctly" - Another free (reg-ware) eBook from Syncfusion
Get into sync with HTTP with the new free (reg-ware) Syncfusion Succinctly eBook, "HTTP Succinctly"
Spelunk the technical details of the PDF format with "PDF Succinctly" from Syncfusion (Free/reg-ware PDF/Mobi ebook)
"Git Succinctly" Free/reg-ware PDF/Mobi ebook)
jQuery Succinctly - Free eBook (reg-ware, PDF and/or Mobi)

Monday, July 23, 2012

F# PacMan!

Phil Trelford's Array - Pacman Tiles

Back in January I built a sample Pacman maze script in F# to use at a Pacman Kata evening with the F#unctional Londoners group. Coincidentally there’s another Coding Kata this Thursday 26th July at Skills Matter. Anyway a couple of weeks ago I started playing with the sample again on the train to and from work, filling in some of the gameplay.

You can play the latest version with your cursor keys and 9 lives below:

...

Windows 8

As the sample runs in Silverlight I thought I’d also try it out on it’s cousin WinRT. WinRT lets you build Metro apps on Windows 8. The transition code wise has been pretty straight forward and I now have a tile for the game appearing on my Windows 8 start page:

...

WinRT is yet another XAML based framework, and is very similar to Silverlight and WPF. One of the few differences I have encountered has been the namespaces the classes are in. For example in Silverlight the Canvas class is in the System.Windows.Controls namespace and in WinRT it is in Windows.UI.Xaml.Controls namespace. It is possible to target both WinRT and Silverlight from the same source code using conditional directives:

...

The WinRT version of the app is implemented in F# and C#. The game part is written in F# as a portable library and the plumbing in C#. There’s a great walkthrough on Creating a Portable F# Library over on MSDN which describes this direction in some detail.

...

image

Who doesn't like a little PacMan written in C#/F# that was converted from Silverlight to run on WinRT and uses the power of the Portable Library? noom... noom... noom...  :)

Saturday, May 12, 2012

Using F# to create a simple image search, i.e. using one image to search for other like images...

dzone - Solr-Lucene Zone - A Simple Search by Image Engine in F#

Last week I was playing with a photomosaic composer toy project and needed a simple search by image engine. By search by image I mean searching a database for an image similar to a given one. In this tutorial I will show you how you can implement this functionality –with some obvious limitations– in an extremely simple way just by looking at an image’s color distribution.

If you are looking for feature similarity (shapes, patterns, etc.) you most likely need edge detection algorithms (linear filters or other similar methods), which give excellent results but are usually quite complicated. I suppose that’s the way most image search engines work. Alternatively this paper describes the sophisticated color-based approach used by Google’s skin-detection engine.

In many cases however, finding images with a perceptually similar color distribution can be enough.

If you are in this situation, you may get away with a very simple technique that still gives pretty good results with a minimal implementation effort. The technique is long known and widely used, but if you have no experience in image processing this step-by-step guide may be a fun and painless warm-up to the topic.

I’ll show the concept with the help of F# code, but the approach is so straightforward that you should understand it even without prior knowledge of the language.

TL;DR:

This is the high level outline of the process.

Just once, to build a database “index”:

  • Create a normalized 8-bit color distribution histogram of each image in the database.

For every query:

  • Create a normalized 8-bit color distribution histogram of the query image.
  • Search the database for the histogram closest to the query using some probability distribution distance function.

If you are still interested in the details of each step, please read on.

...

image..."

I've not thought about how I'd every do something like this so found this article a thought provoking read.

Friday, December 30, 2011

Visual Studio 2010 and .NET Framework 4 Training Kit December 2011 Release (Think "MVC3 VB and OData HOL Love" version)

Microsoft Downloads - Visual Studio 2010 and .NET Framework 4 Training Kit December 2011 Release

Version: 2.2
Date Published: 12/30/2011

Language: English

VS2010TrainingKitDecember2011.Setup.exe, 497.7 MB

The Visual Studio 2010 and .NET Framework 4 Training Kit includes presentations, hands-on labs, and demos. This content is designed to help you learn how to utilize the Visual Studio 2010 features and a variety of framework technologies including:

  • C# 4
  • Visual Basic 10
  • F#
  • Parallel Extensions
  • Windows Communication Foundation
  • Windows Workflow
  • Windows Presentation Foundation
  • Silverlight 4
  • ASP.NET 4
  • Windows 7
  • Entity Framework
  • ADO.NET Data Services
  • Managed Extensibility Framework
  • Application Lifecycle Management
  • Windows Azure
This version of the Training Kit works with Visual Studio 2010 and .NET Framework 4.

..."

Updates in this release;

  • [New] Visual Basic versions of all MVC3 hands on labs
  • [New] Building Applications and Services Using Open Data Protocol hands-on lab
  • [Removed] Introduction to ADO.NET Data Services hands-on lab 

SNAGHTML1ddb4bfa

And a full span of the page;

image

And my usual WinDirStat snap (showing the VB love in the Kit :)

SNAGHTML1de412b2

 

Related Past Post XRef:
June 2011 release of the Visual Studio 2010 and .NET Framework 4 Training Kit (aka v2.0... or double the download size from the Feb 2010 release, or now 1.8GB of offline training, labs, information, goodness)
Visual Studio 2010 and .NET Framework 4 Training Kit – February Release (aka the VS2010 RC Compatible release) – We’re talking 602MB of VS/.Net training stuff here…
Visual Studio 2010 and .NET Framework 4 Training Kit - October Preview (aka VS2010 B2 version) released
A little VS2010/.Net 4 Training Kit with your Beta 1?

Wednesday, September 14, 2011

So you've been asking about the future of F# in VS 11? F# 3.0 Developer Preview now available...

fsharpteam - F# 3.0 Developer Preview Now Available!

"The Visual Studio F# team is excited to announce a preview release of F# 3.0 as part of the Visual Studio 11 Developer Preview, announced on Tuesday at the //build/ conference. This preview is available now for all MSDN subscribers.

The general release will be Friday at 10am PDT. The F# compiler will continue to be available as an independent installation, but that configuration is not part of this preview release.

With F#, we bring you a powerful, succinct, efficient, and expressive language, which allows you to write simple code to solve complex problems. F# is a productivity accelerator—it is used by a growing community to solve analytical programming problems in a variety of domains, such as trading, finance, bio-informatics, blog analysis, advertising, and energy markets. To learn more about F#, visit the F# Developer Center.

With F# 3.0, we are maintaining and expanding this vision through the addition of F# Information Rich Programming, consisting of F# LINQ Queries, the F# Type Provider mechanism, and a set of built-in type providers for enterprise and web data standards.

...

image..."

Good to see F# has a good future in VS 11... Nice to see the new data features.

Saturday, September 03, 2011

When will the 1000th XKCD will come out? F# knows (as in using F# to figure it out...)

Robert Pickering's Strange Blog - Calculating when the 1000th XKCD will appear

"Like so many geeks I’m a massive XKCD fan. But I’m often troubled by questions like when will the 1000th XKCD appear, or the 1024th or even the 2000th? Even though the first two numbers are getting quite close now, it’s still more fingers and toes than I have so working it out by hand is out. Fortunately we have computers to this kind of heavy lifting for us, and the solution in F# is kinda cute.

We need 3 pieces of information to be able to work out when any given XKCD will appear: an epoch date and number as well as the days that XKCD is published on. I chose todays date, 2nd September 2011 when XKCD 946 was published. I would have been nice to start with issue 1, but in the early days of XKCD it wasn’t published regularly so starting at the beginning would considerable complexity the task, and besides, we already know when numbers in the past were published. XKCD is published on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays, so here’s how we encode this information in F#:

...

image..."

There's something that's just dev-geek awesome about this...

Sunday, August 14, 2011

Real World Functional Programming (with F#) now available on MSDN

TomasP.Net - Real-World F# Articles on MSDN

"More than a year ago, Mike Stephens from Manning (who was also behind my Real-World Functional Programming book) asked me if I'd be interested in collaborating on a project for MSDN. The idea was to collaborate with Microsoft on creating some additional content for the official F# Documentation.

A few days ago, the new content appeared on MSDN, so I finally have an excuse for the recent lack of blogging! Although the content contains a large number of new articles that are not based on my book, you can find it in the MSDN section named after my book, right under Visual F#. If you can't wait to check it out, here are all the links:

While working on the articles, I also wrote about a few topics that we didn't use in the final version. You'll see them on my blog in the next few days, as soon as I edit them into a blog post form.

...

SNAGHTML5e22559..."

Real World Functional Programming

image

A little Functional Programming and F#'ness to start, or end, depending on your point of view, week.

Monday, August 01, 2011

.Net vs Managed in the image manipulation world, one ISV’s story (or “How F# helped save the day…”)

Steve's Tech Talk - Building Pure Managed DotImage

“We recently released DotImage 10 and if you’ve been following us for a while, you know that we are committed to building the best .NET imaging components. Since I started at Atalasoft, I have been looking at the issue of making as much of our internals in entirely managed code. From the very beginning, it was a daunting task. I estimated that to do the entire project would be around three person years of engineering time. This begs the question, “is it really worth it?”

On the down side:

  • managed code runs, on average, 1.5x slower than unmanaged code. In image processing, this time stacks up quickly. Operations are routinely repeated billions of times, so we really have to keep an eye on costs.
  • Translating to managed code appears to not add much value as the code appears to be the same – no features added

On the plus side:

  • dotImage will run on the client in Silverlight applications as well as hosted .NET where unmanaged code isn’t allowed
  • Managed code is far more stable – array bounds checking alone is a big win
  • Managed code is simpler to author to and simpler to deploy
  • Managed code is future proof on different processors/OSes
  • Managed code is easier to scale across multiple cores/CPUs

How did we do this? I’ve been playing a chess game with our API over the past 5 years.

This laid the ground work. The next step was to apply a set of porting strategies. My goal was to reuse as much code as possible in this port. This meant using our regular C# code (slam dunk), removing any unsafe code, porting C/C++ (and in some cases choosing to use the new code in both managed and unmanaged ports), adapting APIs when possible (Silverlight doesn’t have System.Drawing, which means no Rectangle, Point, Size or Color objects), writing unit tests that ensure that output matches, running benchmarks to find and eliminate bottlenecks, and so on.

Finally, there is a new secret weapon in our arsenal. A fair amount of DotImage 10 is written in F#.

Yes, you read that right. …

…Since each of these are inlines, the F# optimizer can actually do something useful with the code. In my experience so far, the C# optimizer doesn’t really do much, if anything. So why do we care about this? It’s that lurking 1.5x managed code cost. In my measurements, C#->IL->target CPU does about 1.5x the work of C++->target CPU. Quite honestly, for a virtual language to a virtual machine, this is a very low cost. By using F#, we were able to address this cost by using inlining, code profiling, scanline caching, memoization and other techniques. In many cases we ended up with code that ran in equivalent time to C++ code or in some cases faster.

This is not to say that we didn’t have issues with F#. I found several compiler bugs for which we got some quick work-arounds from Don Syme and his team. I also found some interesting .NET interoperability challenges, but in the end I was able to meet one of my prime rules for picking F#: any object written in F# should be method signature identical to the C# equivalent so that our customers shouldn’t need to know or care about the .NET language implementation choice under the hood. The code should work, it should work well and with no surprises.

…”

This was a great post and I applaud Steve for taking the time to write and Atalasoft for supporting him in allowing it. It’s not every company that will let their people blog about things that are this close to the core.

Also it’s great seeing a real world success story for F#…

Wednesday, July 27, 2011

Stephen Toub says, "I've got your Samples for Parallel Programming with the .NET... right here..."

Microsoft Developer Network - Samples for Parallel Programming with the .NET Framework

"The .NET Framework 4 includes significant advancements for developers writing parallel and concurrent applications, including Parallel LINQ (PLINQ), the Task Parallel Library (TPL), new thread-safe collections, and a variety of new coordination and synchronization data structures.

This sample includes example applications and library functionality that demonstrate, utilize, and augment this support (it is not production quality). This sample is a single .zip containing a single Visual Studio .sln file, which then contains multiple Visual Studio projects that highlight key capabilities provided by the .NET Framework 4 and the parallel programming support it provides. Below are descriptions of the included examples.

(For discussions of Parallel Extensions and/or these samples, visit the forums at http://social.msdn.microsoft.com/Forums/en-US/parallelextensions/threads. For documentation on the parallelism constructs in .NET 4, see http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dd460693(VS.100).aspx. For information direct from the Parallel Extensions team, subscribe to the team blog at http://blogs.msdn.com/pfxteam. For videos/articles on parallelism and Parallel Extensions, visit the Parallel Computing Developer Center at http://msdn.com/concurrency.)

SNAGHTML4ce0db06..."

Looks like these are the samples we've seen before BUT there are some great samples here so a reminder doesn't hurt...

 

Related Past Post XRef:
A Plethora Parallel Programming PDF’s - 12 Parallel Programming with the .NET Framework 4 articles for download
The Coffee Table Guide of the Parallel Programming Samples for .NET 4
Extra .Net 4 Parallel Extension goodness in the Parallel Extension Samples, with RTM updates and a few new Projects
“Samples for Parallel Programming with the .NET Framework 4” gets some VB love…
[Insert Three Hour Tour and/or TPL Report Joke Here] - “A Tour of Various TPL Options” – 28 page free ebook about parallel programming options in .Net via the Task Parallel Library (TPL)
TPL (That is, Task Parallel Library) Article of the Day: “Parent-Child Task Relationships in the .Net Framework 4”
[.Net 4.0]: Get your Parallel Extensions here… All baked in and part of the Core…. Get your Task Parallel Library here…

Monday, July 18, 2011

Quick F# Project and Item Template Round-up

Carl's Blog - F# Project and Item Templates

Over the past few months I have posted up a few Project and Item Templates for F#. Here is a quick summary of those templates.

Assembly Information File Item Template

This extension creates a file called AssemblyInfo.fs, that contains the standard assembly definitions usually associated with other programming languages.

Class Library Project Template

This template creates a Windows Library with a simple class definition.  ...

Windows Service Project Template

This template that provides the elements for the creation windows service in F#. ...

WinForms Project Template

This template is for an F# WinForms application.  ...

image..."

A short and sweet overview of a few of the F# Project and Item templates you can find online in the Visual Studio Gallery

Wednesday, December 22, 2010

F#’ing SilverLight (F# SilverLight Template that is…)

Visual Studio Gallery - F# Silverlight Application

“F# Silverlight Template

Sick of creating C# Silverlight projects simply to host your lovely F# code?
Well, be sick no more - this extension will allow you to create an F# Silverlight App in 1 easy step!

Hope someone out there finds this useful!

…”

This just struck my fancy…

Monday, July 26, 2010

Visual Studio 2010 Keyboard Shortcuts/Keybinding Cards v2 – More page size options, more content, fewer faces

Lisa Feigenbaum - VS 2010 Keyboard Shortcuts for C#, VB, C++, F# Now Available in Letter (8.5x11in) and A4 (210×297mm) Print-Ready Sizes

“Thanks for all the feedback on the Visual Studio 2010 Keyboard Shortcut Posters. We’ve released new versions to take into account your requested changes:

- Create 8.5”x11” Letter-sized print-ready documents
- Create 210x297mm A4-sized print-ready documents
- Remove the people images and keep the space for content

image …”

Microsoft Downloads - Visual Studio 2010 Keybinding Posters

“Reference posters for the default keybindings in Visual Studio 2010 for Visual Basic, Visual C#, Visual C++ and Visual F#

Version: 2010
Date Published: 7/19/2010
Language: English
Download Size: 259 KB - 23.9 MB


High quality, print-ready PDFs in letter & A4 format containing the default keybindings in Visual Studio 2010 for Visual Basic, Visual C#, Visual C++ and Visual F#. High-resolution versions are also available.

image…”

More content + less fluff + more pages options = Happy Camper Greg

Original (VB):

image

Now (VB)

image

 

Related Past Post XRef:
What key [binding] does what again? The “Visual Studio 2010 Keybinding Cards” for C++, C#, F# and VB
Can you smell it? VS2008 RTM is getting close (and it smells good...) - Visual Basic 2008 Keybinding Reference Poster

Saturday, April 10, 2010

What key [binding] does what again? The “Visual Studio 2010 Keybinding Cards” for C++, C#, F# and VB

Microsoft Downloads - Visual Studio 2010 Keybinding Cards

“Reference cards for the default keybindings in Visual Studio 2010 for Visual Basic, Visual C#, Visual C++ and Visual F#

Version: 2010
Date Published: 4/9/2010
Language: English
Download Size: 1.4 MB - 5.7 MB*


A high quality, print-ready PDF containing the default keybindings in Visual Studio 2010 for Visual Basic, Visual C#, Visual C++ and Visual F#.

…”

Here’s a snap of the VB PDF;

image

And the C# PDF;

image

And heck, since I was already there, here’s F# and C++ too

image

image

Here are the direct download URL’s;

http://download.microsoft.com/download/2/9/6/296AAFA4-669A-46FE-9509-93753F7B0F46/VS2010CPP.pdf
http://download.microsoft.com/download/2/9/6/296AAFA4-669A-46FE-9509-93753F7B0F46/VS2010CSharp.pdf
http://download.microsoft.com/download/2/9/6/296AAFA4-669A-46FE-9509-93753F7B0F46/VS2010FSharp.pdf
http://download.microsoft.com/download/2/9/6/296AAFA4-669A-46FE-9509-93753F7B0F46/VS2010VB.pdf

 

Related Past Post XRef:
Can you smell it? VS2008 RTM is getting close (and it smells good...) - Visual Basic 2008 Keybinding Reference Poster

Monday, March 15, 2010

“The F# Survival Guide” – “… the first book you read in your F# journey…”

cto corner - The F# Survival Guide

“Welcome to the F# Survival Guide by John Puopolo with Sandy Squires. We wrote this book to introduce mainstream developers to the world of functional programming through the lens of F#, Microsoft's first fully-supported multi-paradigm language.

In the spirit of a survival guide, this book covers all of the essential elements of functional programming and the F# language. In this regard, the book is concept and keyword complete, covering the entirety of the core F# language and its pragmatic use.

Chapter Links

Ch 0. Introduction
Ch 1. What is Functional Programming?
Ch 2. Hello, F#!
Ch 3. Numeric Types & Operations
Ch 4. Chars & Strings
Ch 5. Booleans & Conditionals
Ch 6. Imperative Loops
Ch 7. Tuples & Arrays
Ch 8. Functions & Functional Concepts
Ch 9. Generic Functions
Ch 10. Lists & Sequences
Ch 11. Aggregate Types
Ch 12. Pattern Matching
Ch 13. Object-Oriented Programming I
Ch 14. Object-Oriented Programming II
Ch 15. Exceptions & Debugging
Ch 16. Workflows & Async Programming
Ch 17. Packaging & Interfacing with .NET

image …”

The F# Survival Guide - Chapter 0 Introduction

“Introduction

Welcome to The F# Survival Guide. The purpose of this Web book is to provide a solid foundation and pragmatic introduction to F# programming and its functional underpinnings.

I wrote this book with the intent that it is the first book you read in your F# journey. Along these lines, this book covers the entirety of the core F# language, as available November 2009. It covers all of the documented (and some of the less documented) concepts, keywords, constructs, types, and language symbols. In addition, I have tried to provide short examples that capture the essence of the topic at hand, while at the same time discussing real-world impacts. My hope is that after reading this book, you will be able to develop non-trivial applications using F#, and will be able to readily extend your learning via additional resources.

image

…”

This looks like some great F# material. The book “got me” by the second paragraph… :)

(via Mark Pearl - Great F# getting started online book)

Thursday, February 11, 2010

Visual Studio 2010 and .NET Framework 4 Training Kit – February Release (aka the VS2010 RC Compatible release) – We’re talking 602MB of VS/.Net training stuff here…

Microsoft Downloads - Visual Studio 2010 and .NET Framework 4 Training Kit - February Release

“February Release of the Visual Studio 2010 and .NET Framework 4 Training Kit

File Name: VS2010TrainingKitFebruarySetup.exe
Version: 1.3
Date Published: 2/10/2010
Language: English
Download Size: 199.4 MB


Overview

The Visual Studio 2010 and .NET Framework 4 Training Kit includes presentations, hands-on labs, and demos. This content is designed to help you learn how to utilize the Visual Studio 2010 features and a variety of framework technologies including:

  • C# 4.0
  • Visual Basic 10
  • F#
  • Parallel Extensions
  • Windows Communication Foundation
  • Windows Workflow
  • Windows Presentation Foundation
  • ASP.NET 4
  • Windows 7
  • Entity Framework
  • ADO.NET Data Services
  • Managed Extensibility Framework
  • Visual Studio Team System
This version of the Training Kit works with Visual Studio 2010 RC and .NET Framework 4 RC. [GD: Emphasis Added] 

…”

Holly cow… The download size has grown by 106MB since v1.1. From a compressed 93MB in v1.1 to a compressed 199MB (602MB uncompressed!) in this version. Wow

For a view of the v1.1 and v1.0 check out Visual Studio 2010 and .NET Framework 4 Training Kit - October Preview (aka VS2010 B2 version) released  & A little VS2010/.Net 4 Training Kit with your Beta 1?

 

Here’s a snap from the main page;

image

And a snap, via WinDirStat, of the contents. The 602MB isn’t just a ton of videos (there’s actually no “videos” on disk, they are all being hosted and streamed from Channel 9 is seems) but instead just tons of data, doc’s, resources and code.

image

 

Related Past Post XRef:
Visual Studio 2010 and .NET Framework 4 Training Kit - October Preview (aka VS2010 B2 version) released
A little VS2010/.Net 4 Training Kit with your Beta 1?

Visual Studio 2010 Licensing White Paper (includes Team Foundation Server, Lab Management and IntelliTrace)
VS 2010 RC now available for download to the general public (no MSDN Subscription required)
VS2010 RC now available on MSDN Subscribers Download. General availably coming tomorrow (February 10th)
VS2010/.Net 4 release date slips and we get a public RC in February to make up for it (and I’m okay with it)

Visual Studio 2010/.Net 4.0 B2 now available via MSDN Subscribers Download, new SKU names (Ultimate, Premium, Express Combo) and VS2010 launch dates announced
VSTS/TFS2010 Beta 2 coming “real soon” and will have a “Go Live” license (i.e. Now’s the time to start getting ready…)

Wednesday, February 10, 2010

VS 2010 RC now available for download to the general public (no MSDN Subscription required)

MSDN - Visual Studio 2010 and .NET Framework 4 Release Candidate

“...

Download the RC
Below are many download options for you to choose from. If you have any questions about getting started with ISO files, check out Chuck Sterling's step-by-step guide.

Downloads

Visual Studio

Visual Studio Extensibility

Test Products

Team Foundation Server

.NET Framework

Windows Azure Tools

image …”

Microsoft Downloads - Microsoft Visual Studio 2010 Ultimate RC – ISO

“Microsoft Visual Studio 2010 Ultimate simplifies solution development, lowering risk and increasing return. Tools for every stage of the lifecycle, from design and development through test and deployment, let you unleash your imagination and deliver impactful solutions. This download is an ISO image that can be burned to blank media for installation.

…”

Most/all the public downloads are ISO’s, broken into multiple parts/downloads. When/if I see I download list helper post I’ll also post that (i.e. something Brian Keller often does, a list of direct download links you can feed into Free Download Manager, etc to make it easier to download the these multipart ISO’s)

Anyway, what are you doing still reading this? Start downloading!  ;)

 

Related Past Post XRef:
Visual Studio 2010 Licensing White Paper (includes Team Foundation Server, Lab Management and IntelliTrace)

Help for (Visual Studio) Help in VS 2010 (and VS2010 SP1)

VS2010 RC now available on MSDN Subscribers Download. General availably coming tomorrow (February 10th)

VS2010/.Net 4 release date slips and we get a public RC in February to make up for it (and I’m okay with it)

Visual Studio 2010/.Net 4.0 B2 now available via MSDN Subscribers Download, new SKU names (Ultimate, Premium, Express Combo) and VS2010 launch dates announced
VSTS/TFS2010 Beta 2 coming “real soon” and will have a “Go Live” license (i.e. Now’s the time to start getting ready…)

Tuesday, February 09, 2010

VS2010 RC now available on MSDN Subscribers Download. General availably coming tomorrow (February 10th)

Somasegar's WebLog - Visual Studio 2010 and .NET Framework 4 Release Candidate now available

“Today, we are making available the Release Candidate (RC) for Visual Studio 2010 and .NET Framework 4 to all MSDN subscribers.  The RC will be made available to the world on Wednesday, February 10th. The RC includes a go-live license for people who want to deploy in their production environment.

…”

Jason Zander's WebLog - Announcing VS2010 / .NET Framework 4 Release Candidate (RC)

“Today I’m pleased to announce we have shipped the RC for Visual Studio 2010 / .NET Framework 4!  MSDN subscribers can download the bits immediately from this location.  The RC will be made available to the public on Wednesday February 10.

We got a lot of invaluable feedback on Beta 2 through Connect as well as your survey responses.  In particular many of you pointed out areas of performance where we were not at parity with VS2008 and it was impacting your ability to adopt the product.  Some of those areas of feedback included general UI responsiveness (including painting, menus, remote desktop and VMs), editing (typing, scrolling, and Intelisense), designers (Silverlight and WPF in particular), improved memory usage, debugging (stepping, managed / native interop), build times, and solution/project load.

…”

MSDN - Visual Studio 2010 and .NET Framework 4 Release Candidate

image

 

Awesome! I’m looking forward to getting home and trying this on my PDC Acer (since VS2010 B2 was… um… “interesting” to use on it ;)

image

 

Related Past Post XRef:
VS2010/.Net 4 release date slips and we get a public RC in February to make up for it (and I’m okay with it)
Visual Studio 2010/.Net 4.0 B2 now available via MSDN Subscribers Download, new SKU names (Ultimate, Premium, Express Combo) and VS2010 launch dates announced
VSTS/TFS2010 Beta 2 coming “real soon” and will have a “Go Live” license (i.e. Now’s the time to start getting ready…)

Monday, January 25, 2010

F#, fun projects and being an Evil Genius (and of course world domination)

Chris Smith's completely unique viewBeing an Evil Genius with F# and .NET

“A couple weeks ago I was in glorious Sandusky, Ohio presenting at CodeMash. CodeMash is a community driven conference that’s less about product announcements and typical “rah rah” and more about getting smart people together to talk about what they are passionate about – coding.

Rather than doing the prototypical “Intro to F# Talk” I figured I go with something a bit more fun and relevant to the every day developer. Sure F# is neat and everything – but why bother to learn a new programming language unless you can use it to do something meaningful. Well, in addition excelling at both functional and object-oriented programming, F# is ideal for world domination.

------------------------------------------------------

Slide1

To be honest, this may be the best talk abstract I’ll ever write.

image

…”

Awesome. Not only F# coolness, but having fun with F#! We’re talking USB Missile Launchers, voice recognition, image processing, facial recognition and more…

(via Alvin Ashcraft's Morning Dew - Dew Drop – January 25, 2010)