Showing posts with label Development. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Development. Show all posts

Thursday, July 17, 2014

Make your Debugger feel Pretty, with help from DotNet Pretty your Debugger*Attribute helper

<gordon's blog/> - Introduction to DotNet Pretty

Some Background on why

Another thing that come out of last weeks training was Visual Studio Debuggers. This lead to me finding the coolest visualizer ever called TPL Dataflow Debugger Visualizer which allows you to easily visualize your TPL Dataflow

image

Because I found this awesome visualizer I decided that everything while debugging could be awesome if there were more of these so I have created a GitHub project called DotNet Pretty where I plan on creating many visualizers to really try light up the debugging experience.

What is DebuggerDisplayAttribute?

In case you don't know DebuggerDisplayAttribute is used when you want to have a "pretty" representation of the properties in your class when seeing it in the debugger.

...

It doesn't seem like such a big deal with 1 object but think of how easy it would be to know stuff about objects when they in a list if they each implemented this attribute. Now obviously to use the attribute like this you need to own the object so you can add the attribute and release it.

DotNet Pretty's first contribution

The first contribution to DotNet Pretty is one that was used in the training which allows you to use the DebuggerDisplay Attribute in a different way.

Code

This time you specify the target in the attribute like below...

image

...

How is the TDL Dataflow visualizer done?

In short the TPL Dataflow visualizer uses the DebuggerVisualizerAttribute which looks something like below

image

I will do a in detail post on DebuggerVisualizer Attribute when I add one to DotNet Pretty. For now though you can browse the source code of the TPL Dataflow Debugger Visualizer on CodePlex.

So what's the plan?

My plan at the moment is to find the .net types that I use most and implement visualizers for them. I'm planning on trying to get some nice ones in for TFS objects like Work Items. I'm hoping that others will use this library of visualizers and fork the code and help grow it.

...

We, well I, really don't much action, press, chatter about Debugger*Attribute usage. That's why when I saw TPL Dataflow Debugger Visualizer I had to queue it up for a Coding4Fun Blog post. Now Gordon's post. Looks like it's time for a little Debugger*Attribute resurgence doesn't it?

Wednesday, July 16, 2014

Using OpenXML to load an Excel Worksheet into a DataTable (or just how different OpenXML is from the old Excel API we're used too)

dotnet thoughts - Read Excel as DataTable using OpenXML and C#

In the current project we were using OpenXML extensively for reading Excel files. Here is the code snippet, which will help you to read / convert Excel files to DataTable.

image

..."

You've heard me whine about how, while OpenXML is cool and how nice it is that we can access Office 2007+ files without Office or third party apps, yet the API is pretty darn different for traditional Office Object Model users? This screenshot shows why... Parts, SharedStringTables, oh my... It's not hard, just takes a while to wrap your head around.

Unified Windows Dev Portal, Documentation (and more)

Building Apps for Windows - New Opportunity: Kinect for Windows + Unified Windows developer portal and documentation and 21 additional payout markets

Earlier this week Microsoft released the Kinect for Windows Public Preview which represents a new opportunity for Windows developers, as apps created with the new SDK may be published to the Window Store later this year. We’re making plans to prominently feature Kinect-enabled apps to provide customers with an exciting new Windows experience. I’d like to encourage you to download the preview today and be one of the first to publish a Windows app integrating the Kinect experience.

Today we are also taking the next step in the journey to a single unified Windows platform which began last November with unified developer registration, and continued at Build with universal Windows apps. With this release, we are bringing together Windows Phone and Windows Store online developer resources including education materials, guidance, code samples and reference documentation. We now have a single Windows Dev Center website – dev.windows.com – to aid those of you developing apps and games across phone, tablet and PC.

Finally, this week we’re also expanding the number of payout markets to include 21 new markets from which you can submit paid apps. This includes apps with in-app purchase, the fastest growing Store revenue model, representing nearly 50% of Windows Phone developer payout and over 30% of Windows payout – and growing.

New opportunity: Kinect for Windows

[GD: Check out my Channel 9 Coding4Fun Kinect Gallery post, It's Kinect for Windows v2 Day!]

...

dev.windows.com, the one place to learn about Windows app development

image

In the unified site you will find the content and guidance for both Windows Phone and Windows Dev Centers consolidated in to a single location. Learn about design, find the tools you need for development, and understand the steps to publish universal Windows apps. We’ve also combined code samples and forums into a single, convenient location.

Unified documentation: You will now see a comprehensive, combined documentation set to help you learn how to build apps for Windows devices (phone, tablet and PC), with API and feature distinctions clearly called out. Documentation is now available in 11 languages: German, English, Spanish, French, Italian, Japanese, Korean, Brazilian Portuguese, Russian, Simplified Chinese and Traditional Chinese.

Single location for code samples: The code samples for Windows Phone and Windows Store apps, as well as for universal Windows apps, continue to be published in the MSDN code gallery. The difference is that they are now easily accessible directly from one Dev Center page.

Single location for developer forums: The Windows Store apps and Windows Phone developer forums have been merged into one streamlined set of forums. The dashboard forums have been combined so that they appear together in one location, while the technical forums remain specialized for each form factor.

The dashboards will remain separate for Windows Phone and Windows. When you first click the Dashboard link in the Dev Center, you’ll be able to choose which one to start with. After that, switching between the two is simple. Just use the link in the left-hand navigation pane.

...

Nice to see the Windows/Phone unification continue. It's investments in things like this that gives me hope (you know, how the doc's are always last'ish? So if doc's are being updated, then it looks like this might stick... :)

Thursday, July 10, 2014

The WebBrowser in VS making you crazy with its IE7 emulation mode? Here's how you can IE 8/9/10/11 it and more... (Think "WebBrowser Control Emulation Mode" post of the day)

Robert MacLean - Improve the embedded browser in Visual Studio

Visual Studio has an embedded browser, but it uses the IE 7 render path?! Really, that is pretty messed up.

image

Thankfully, you can fix this yourself with a quick registry addition. Note: Fiddling with the registry can break your device, so be careful and this carries the usual “this works on my machine” and it is your own risk for doing this. The key you need to care about is:

... [Click through to see the reg hack... I didn't want to steal his secret sauce... ;]

I set the value to (HEX) 2af9 – since I have IE 11 on my Windows 8.1 machine, but you can pick from the list of options to best suit your needs and now it just works! No issues on GitHub

image

..."

Internet Explorer Dev Center - Internet Feature Controls (B..C)

...

Browser Emulation

Windows Internet Explorer 8 and later. The FEATURE_BROWSER_EMULATION feature defines the default emulation mode for Internet Explorer and supports the following values.

image

...

I know you're thinking, "VS just embed's the WebBrowser control, which I like to do to, sometimes. Can I make this magic happen for me too?" Or "I'd like a little more detail and depth!"

Funny you should ask that...

Cyotek Blog - Configuring the emulation mode of an Internet Explorer WebBrowser control

Occasionally I need to embed HTML in my applications. If it is just to display some simple layout with basic interactions, I might use a component such as HtmlRenderer. In most cases however, I need a more complex layout, JavaScript or I might want to display real pages from the internet - in which case I'm lumbered with the WebBrowser control.

I'm aware other embeddable browsers exist, but the idea of shipping additional multi-MB dependencies doesn't make sense unless an application makes heavy use of HTML interfaces

The WebBrowser control annoys me in myriad ways, but it does get the job done. One of the things that occasionally frustrates me is that by default it is essentially an embedded version of Internet Explorer 7 - or enabling Compatibility Mode in a modern IE session. Not so good as more and more sites use HTML5 and other goodies.

Rather fortunately however, Microsoft provide the ability to configure the emulation mode your application will use. It's not as simple as setting some properties on a control as it involves setting some registry values and other caveats, but it is still a reasonable process.

...

image

There you go! Just about everything you've every wanted to know about this (or not)

Five Free Icon Packs for the Dev in your Cube...

Dean Hume's, Coding Tips & Tricks - Free icon packs for developers

Over the years, I have started to hoard a collection of links to various free icons that I find on the net. Often, I use these icons to spruce up simple prototypes or just make my web pages look livelier. Unfortunately, I've been collecting these links to icon packs and never get the chance to use half of them! If you are a web developer that has need for free icons, then this might be for you.

This article will hopefully provide you with a list of free icons that you can use in your day to day development. This list features five great icons packs that are available to download today.

IconMonstr ...

IcoMoon ...

Simple Icons ...

The Entypo Pictogram Suite ...

Typicons ...

image...

Can't have enough of these kinds of resources cached. What's great is that all but one of these are new to me. :)

 

Related Past Post XRef:
I HAZ ICONZ MONSTRZ- 1309+ Free icons from iconmonstr (PNG, SVG)

A community created GuidGen, GuidGen 2.0 (a replacement for Guid tool you love to hate, hate to love)

Visual Studio Gallery - GuidGen 2.0

Provides a new Create GUID command in the Tools menu with a new WPF surface, and featuring code tailored for C# and VB.NET developers to define Guid fields. Also provides editor inline code completions for adding GUIDs, guid fields and guid attributes for C# and VB.NET!

Let's face it. The Create Guid (guidgen.exe) tool that ships with VS is over a decade old and is old Win32 GDI based. It also doesn't produce any code snippets useful for C#/VB developers.

GuidGen 2.0 is a new face to creating GUIDs. And includes C#/VB code snippets!

image

But a separate app to copy GUIDs from into the editor is still old school. Why not have inline editor completions for GUIDs? Just type "guid" in your C# or VB code files, then click on "Guids" or press Alt+. to select the Guids tab with the keyboard.

image

..."

A new face for the tool I'm sure we've all used at one time or another (or not...)

I love the addition of the code snips. :)

 

Related Past Post XRef:
Visual Studio Add-In of the Day - Inline Guid Generator

Tuesday, July 08, 2014

Visual Studio "14" CTP 2 is now available. There's many more CTP's coming, ALL CAPS are not, no TFS "14" CTP's, don't side-by-side this CTP and more...

Brian Harry has the quote of the day for this release...

Brian Harry’s blog - Visual Studio “14” CTP 2 Available

I’m not going to make too big a deal about this because there’s going to be tons of them between now and when VS “14” ships.  But we shipped another CTP today and you can learn more about it here: http://blogs.msdn.com/b/visualstudio/archive/2014/07/08/visual-studio-14-ctp-2-available.aspx

We’re continuing the practice of making Azure VM templates available to make it really easy to try out the CTPs....

...

For reasons I explained in my last post on the subject, we are not releasing TFS “14” CTPs at this time and, quite honestly, won’t for a while.  We will start releasing CTPs of TFS well before the release but there’s just not a good enough cost benefit analysis to it right now.  You can see the majority of the work we are doing on VS Online as we do it.

The Visual Studio Blog - Visual Studio “14” CTP 2 Available

Today we released CTP 2 of Visual Studio “14”, which is the codename for the next version of Visual Studio. To get started, you can download the bits (also available on MSDN subscriber downloads), or use the VM in Azure we’re making available (see the note below). In addition to the new features we added in CTP 1, this CTP also includes:

  • Save and Apply Custom IDE Layouts. You can now save and apply custom layouts for tool windows in the IDE. The Save Window Layout and Apply Window Layout commands are under the Window Menu and you can also rename, reorder, and delete layouts from Manage Window Layouts.
  • Light Bulb Editor Adornment. Light Bulbs are an extensible editor adornment to identify and help you fix issues in your code. To use them, place the caret on a line with an issue or hover over an issue and you’ll see a light bulb that lists actions you can take to resolve the problem and even a preview of proposed solutions.
  • Editor Touch Support. The Visual Studio Editor now supports touch gestures for scrolling, pinch-to-zoom, tap-and-hold for context menus, double-tap for word selection, and line selection by tapping in the margin.
  • VC++ Property Pages and Editor Enhancements. We updated the Configuration and Platform dropdown values for VC++ Property Page dialog to remember the last user selection when the dialog is closed. We also added Move Function Definition (move the body of a function definition to source or header/in-class definition) and Implement Pure Virtuals (quickly create definitions for a class that inherits constructs ([abstract] class, struct, etc.) containing pure virtuals). We also updated Create Declaration/Definition to include Code Peek and improved Find in Files to enable subsequent results to be appended to previous results ("append mode"). Checkout the VC Blog for details on these enhancements.
  • ALL CAPS. Last week with the RC for Visual Studio 2013 Update 3 we added an option to sentence case menus; in this VS “14” CTP we changed Menu Bar styling to Title Case for everyone to help us get feedback on the change. We’ll use the feedback we get to help determine if we keep it as it is in this preview, make it an option under the Tools/Options menu, or take some other path.

...

Visual Studio "14" CTP release notes

...

Notes:

  • CTPs are English only.
  • CTPs are unsupported and are intended to be used for testing, trial, and feedback purposes only.
  • CTPs have not been subject to final validation. They are not meant to be run on production workstations or servers, or used to create production code. Installing a CTP on a production server will put the server in an unsupported state.
  • Although these CTPs are intended to be installed side-by-side with earlier versions of Visual Studio, complete compatibility on every CTP is not guaranteed.

...

    Visual Studio "14" CTP 2 (version 14.0.21901.1.DP) details
    Technology improvements

    The following technology improvements have been made in this release.
    ASP.NET and web development

    • ASP.NET vNext: This release of Visual Studio supports creating and developing ASP.NET vNext applications. ASP.NET vNext is a lean and composable .NET stack for building modern web applications for both cloud and on-premises servers. It includes the following features:
      • ASP.NET MVC and Web API have been unified into a single programming model.
      • A no-compile developer experience.
      • Environment-based configuration for a seamless transition to the cloud.
      • Dependency injection out-of-the-box.
      • New cloud-optimized runtime supports true side-by-side versioning. 
      • NuGet everything, even the runtime itself.
      • Run in IIS, or self-hosted in your own process.
      • All open source through the .NET Foundation

        (http://www.dotnetfoundation.org/)

        , and takes contributions.

      For more information about ASP.NET vNext in Visual Studio, go to the ASP.NET vNext

      (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=400692)

      website.

    • This release of Visual Studio also includes all the current ASP.NET and web development features that are released as parts of Visual Studio 2013 Update 2. Learn more here

      (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=400693)

      .

    Visual C++

    • Find in Files has been updated to enable subsequent results to be added to previous results ("append mode"). Results can now also be edited or deleted.
    • Implement Pure Virtuals enables a user to quickly create definitions for a class that inherits constructs (such as abstract class, struct) containing pure virtuals. Both multiple and recursive inheritances are supported. Activate the feature through right-clicking a class definition (implement all pure virtuals) or an inherited base construct (implement pure virtuals in that base only). Double-slash comments (//) are used to delimit groups of functions implemented from individual bases.
    • Move Function Definition enables a user to move the body of a function definition to source or header/in-class definition. It must be activated through the right-click context menu on a function's signature.

    Visual Studio IDE

    • Menu Bars will show in Title Case style instead of All Caps style.
    • Support for touch in the Visual Studio Editor is now available. This includes touch for scrolling, pinch-to-zoom, tap-and-hold for context menus, double-tap for word selection, and line selection by tapping in the margin. 
    • The Configuration and Platform dropdown values for the VC Property Page dialog have been changed to remember the last user selection when closed and reopened. 
    • Users can save custom layouts by clicking Save Window Layout from the Window menu. Users can apply a custom layout by clicking Apply Window Layout from the Window menu, and users can delete, rename, or reorder layouts by clicking Manage Window Layout from the Window menu. The first nine layouts also have keyboard shortcuts from Ctrl+Alt+1 to Ctrl+Alt+9.
    • In this CTP, we are rounding out Light Bulbs that are the quick and easy way to obtain helpful fixes for known issues in your code inside the Visual Studio Editor. If you have an issue in your code, placing your editor caret on the line where the issue is shown or hovering over the issue will present a light bulb that shows helpful actions you can take to resolve the problem together with a preview of the results of each action. 
      This feature is publicly extensible, so Visual Studio extenders can provide their own suggested actions.
    • After you apply this CTP, you can create an empty C# and JavaScript shared project from the File > New Project menu. Phone Projects, Store Projects, and Universal Projects that are written in JavaScript and C# can consume one or many of these shared projects. Shared project references can be managed (added or removed) by using the Reference Manager. Shared Project referencing is also available for some classic desktop C# projects. The project types and languages that support Shared Projects will continue to expand in future CTPs.
    • In this CTP, Visual Studio now supports high-resolution icons in the Error List.
    Known issues
    Installation
    Installing Visual Studio "14" CTP side-by-side with Visual Studio 2013
    • There are known issues when you install Visual Studio "14" CTP 14.0.21901.1 DP on the same computer as Visual Studio 2013. While we expect that an uninstallation of Visual Studio "14" and then a repair of Visual Studio 2013 should fix these issues, our safest recommendation is to install Visual Studio "14" in a virtual machine, a virtual hard disk (VHD), a fresh computer, or another non-production test-only computer that does not have Visual Studio 2013 on it. These Visual Studio side-by-side issues are expected to be fixed soon.

    Client Platform

    • Uninstalling Visual Studio "14" CTP removes TypeScript from Visual Studio 2013.

    Upgrading

    • Because of a known issue, when you install Visual Studio "14" CTP 14.0.21901.1 DP on the same computer that has Visual Studio "14" CTP 14.0.21730.1 DP installed, your Windows Store projects may fail to launch. 
      To work around this issue, repair the installation of Visual Studio "14" CTP 14.0.21901.1 DP after the upgrade. To avoid this issue, our safest recommendation is to uninstall Visual Studio "14" CTP 14.0.21730.1 DP before you install the new CTP version. This build-to-build upgrade issue has been fixed for future upgrades from Visual Studio "14" 14.0.21901.1 DP.

    Visual C++

    • The native "Memory Usage" tool does not work when targeting Win32 (x86).  Targeting x64 works as expected.

    ...

    In short, it's a CTP. Don't install it on a production box. Use the Azure VM!

    Thursday, June 26, 2014

    From AppStudio to Android, porting AppStudio apps with a little help from Xamarin

    Just a couple days ago I blogged about how you can take your AppStudio app and load it into Visual Studio, From Studio to Studio - Apps made in App Studio, opened in Visual Studio. This post is even cooler, taking it to a whole new level...

    Falafel - Porting a Windows App Studio Universal App to Android Using Xamarin

    Microsoft's App Studio is a fantastic tool to help you design and generate applications for Windows Phone as well as Universal Apps for both the phone and Windows. The online interface allows you to add content like RSS feeds, Facebook pages, Flicker photos and more with a few clicks, generating a complete Visual Studio solution that can immediately be launched on the phone or desktop.

    Today we'll look at how we can enhance the App Studio solution’s Portable Class Library so that we can use Xamarin to add an Android version of the app.

    Creating the Solution with App Studio

    I want to keep things as simple as possible, so for this example, I'm using the "Empty App" template, adding a single feed from our Falafel Blogs. Here's a quick look at the project page on App Studio:

    image

    Retargeting the PCL for Xamarin

    The Universal project includes a Data project which contains the classes for accessing data which we will want to share to the Xamarin Android project. Although this is a Portable Class Library, it's only targeted to Windows and Windows Phone 8.1. A quick change to the project properties will take care of that.

    ...

    ...

    Adding the Android Project

    At this point your solution should be able to build, and we can proceed to add the Android Xamarin project. Obviously you need to have Xamarin installed, and for more information on getting started be sure to take a look at their Getting Started With Android Guide.

    Add a new Android project to the solution. One important thing I discovered is that if the name of your app ends with ".Android" you will have problems resolving references from the Android component libraries in Xamarin.

    ...

    image

    ...

    Conclusions and Considerations

    I kept things simple here, using the minimal amount of code from the AppStudio.Data project to make it easy to port to Android. Obviously the more components and datasources your App Studio project uses, the more complex it might be to port everything over.

    However, we have seen that Xamarin can be a true cross-platform solution, reusing C# code developed exclusively for use by Windows and with only some minor changes and a new UI, expand its reach to an entirely new platform!

    Download the source code and try it for yourself: ... [GD: Click through for the link]

    ...

    image..."

    You have to admit, that's pretty darn cool. I wouldn't have ever thought that I could take an AppStudio app and with a little tweaking get it run on Android. That's like some kind of Xamarin super power or something (well the super power of portable at least... :)

    Wednesday, June 25, 2014

    .NET Framework setup verification, cleanup tool and detection code (C++) updated for 4.5.2

    Aaron Stebner's WebLog - .NET Framework setup verification tool, cleanup tool and detection sample code now support .NET Framework 4.5.2

    I have posted updated versions of the .NET Framework setup verification tool, the .NET Framework cleanup tool, and the sample code to detect .NET Framework install states that support detecting, verifying, and cleaning up the .NET Framework 4.5.2. You can find more information about how to download and use these tools at the following locations:

    Besides the two cool tools Aaron mentions (which are must haves for anyone troubleshooting .NET installs), if you're writing code to detect what version of the .NET framework is installed on a given machine you HAVE to check out his post;

    Sample code to detect .NET Framework install state and service pack level

    ...

    .NET Framework versions that can be detected by the sample code

    The sample code available via this article supports detecting the install state and service pack level for the following versions of the .NET Framework:

    • .NET Framework 1.0
    • .NET Framework 1.1
    • .NET Framework 2.0
    • .NET Framework 3.0
    • .NET Framework 3.5
    • .NET Framework 4 (Client and Full)
    • .NET Framework 4.5
    • .NET Framework 4.5.1
    • .NET Framework 4.5.2

    ...

    image..."

     

    Related Past Post XRef:
    Microsoft .NET Framework 4.5.2 Released

    Two Terrific Troubleshooting Tools -The .NET Framework Cleanup and Setup Verification Tools

    .Net 4 Client Profile/Full silent install/repair/uninstall command line options

    4+1 Free Resources for Windows Store and Windows Phone App Development

    Rob W Irving - Great free resources for improving your Windows Phone App

    Last month at the MMADNJ user group Nick Landry (@ActiveNick) started doing a ‘show & tell’ segment for published app developers to share some of their work. I talked about Car Dash and shared some tips and free resources I used to make the app successful.

    Today I wanted to go into some more details on some of these resources. There a lot of great tools available, and many of them are free for independent app developers.

    UserVoice ....

    OneSkyApp ...

    WPCentral and WMPowerUser ...

    Modern UI Icons ...

    image..."

    See you learn something new every day. I hadn't heard of OneSkyApp or Modern UI Icons before reading Rob's post. I love the Net! :)

    Roslyn (aka .NET Compiler Platform) for mere mortals, with Beth Massi

    Beth Massi - .NET Compiler Platform ("Roslyn") for the Rest of Us

    The .NET Compiler Platform (code named "Roslyn") is the next generation of the Visual Basic and C# .NET compilers. At BUILD 2014 Roslyn was released as an open source software project and the team is accepting contributions from the community.

    In this interview I sit down with Dustin Campbell, a Program Manager on the managed languages team, and we talk about what Roslyn means for a .NET developer like myself. Even if you're not a compiler geek, Roslyn brings a ton of value to anyone writing VB or C# code. By making it much easier for partners to build amazing tools and for language and IDE features to get implemented much faster, developers everywhere will benefit from the faster innovation. Dustin also shows off some of the new IDE features like quick fixes and new refactorings that are available in the Visual Studio "14" CTP.  

    For more information on Roslyn and to try it out, see "Installing the Preview" section of the Codeplex site at https://roslyn.codeplex.com/

    Watch: .NET Compiler Platform ("Roslyn") for the Rest of Us 

    image

    [GD: Post Leached in Full]

    Might be a great starting point to help you explain why you are so excited about Roslyn to your co-workers and dev peers...

    Monday, June 23, 2014

    From Studio to Studio - Apps made in App Studio, opened in Visual Studio

    Pluralsight blog - Taking Windows Phone apps from App Studio to Visual Studio

    Microsoft’s App Studio just got a whole lot more powerful. In the latest version, you can make universal apps that run on Windows Phone 8.1 and Windows 8.1, as well as Windows Phone 8 apps – you can also include maps, music and RSS feeds. Even better, you can speed up the whole process by getting started in App Studio and then opening your code in Visual Studio.

    ...

    You can also create your entire app right in App Studio. This includes making the manifest by adding details in the Publisher info section; you’ll need to create a privacy statement and include the publisher information for your developer account if you want it published to the official Store. It should also be noted that you’ll have to create screenshots separately, since you can’t do this in App Studio (you can either run it on your device or load it in Visual Studio and grab screenshots from the emulator).

    Opening apps in Visual Studio

    If you want to add social connections, tweak the Windows tile, create a multilingual app or include advertising, you’ll need to open your app in Visual Studio. To do this, make sure you have Visual Studio and the latest version of the Windows Phone SDK installed (download here). Choose “Finish” on the App Studio site, then “Generate.” Along with the installable download package and the Publish package, this also generates a source code package. If you created an app in the first version of App Studio, it’s worth going back and getting the source code again; the new release creates much cleaner, higher quality code using the MVVM pattern.

    ...

    image

    AppStudio can make Windows Phone 8 apps or universal phone and Windows apps.

    Remember, you can choose Windows Phone 8 or universal apps here; they need Windows Phone 8.1 so if you don’t have the developer preview on your phone, you won’t be able to sideload them. If you want, you can generate the Windows Phone 8 app, then click the Generate button again to get the universal code. (You’ll need to change the App.zip file name if you download both, but you’ll probably want to do that anyway.)

    If you don’t want to go through the steps of starting your app on App Studio, you can also download the source code for the two sample apps on the site. This gives you an outline MVVM app you can use to get started, with placeholders that can be changed.

    When you open your project, Visual Studio should automatically load the packages from NuGet that App Studio uses, ...

    ...

    To localize an app with multiple languages, open the AppResources.resx file in the Resources folder of your project source code. On the project’s Properties page in the Supported Culture box, select whichever languages you want to use for the UI.

    Visual Studio will create a new resource file for each supported language that is a duplicate of the AppResources.resx default language resource file, renamed using the locale code, such as AppResources.de-DE.resx for German and Germany or AppResources.de-AT.resx for German and Austria. Edit each language file to put in the correct UI strings. Now, when you build, your app should be multi-lingual.

    The new version of App Studio makes more powerful apps than the original, but they’re still basic. Opening the code in Visual Studio means you can get started with an app quickly, including adding resources like tiles and icons. In a nutshell, the new App Studio lets you get cracking on the interesting code more quickly.

    ... [Click through to read the entire post, see all the pictures and support the author :]

    I dig that you can kind of scaffold the app in App Studio and then apply your personal tweaks in VS. The power dev's can make their App Studio App's stand out from the rest... :)

    Wednesday, June 11, 2014

    VS 2012, VS 2013 and .NET Framework Doc's for offline installs (i.e. an ISO)

    Microsoft Downloads - Microsoft Visual Studio and .NET Framework Documentation (ISO image)

    This download includes an ISO image file of the Visual Studio and .NET Framework documentation—overviews, how-to articles, API reference pages, sample code, and more—to help you in your development efforts

    Date Published: 6/10/2014

    VS2012Documentation.iso, 2.7 GB

    VS2013Documentation.iso, 4.0 GB

    Visual Studio is a family of products, tools, and technologies that you can use to build powerful, high-performance apps, including Windows Store, desktop, web, phone, and game-console apps. You can write code in Visual Basic, Visual C#, Visual C++, Visual F#, and JavaScript, and create mixed-language solutions. And you can simplify the development of your apps by using the .NET Framework.

    This download includes an ISO image file of the Visual Studio and .NET Framework documentation—overviews, how-to articles, API reference pages, sample code, and more—to help you in your development efforts. It includes multiple ISO files for different versions of the Visual Studio and .NET Framework documentation. When you choose the Download button, you’ll be prompted to select one of these files (see Quick Details for a list).

    After you download the ISO image file, you can record, or "burn," the image to a recordable DVD for later installation or redistribution. You can also open the ISO image file and copy its contents to a local folder, or you can mount and access the ISO image file as a virtual device.
    The Visual Studio and .NET Framework documentation is provided in the following formats:

    • Online, in the MSDN Library (this is the most up-to-date content):
    • Offline, through downloadable books (available from the Visual Studio Help menu).
    • (This download) As a DVD5 ISO image file, which is a copy of a DVD that includes the documentation. The image file is provided for users who want to create an installation DVD (for example, administrators who want to install the documentation on multiple computers offline). If you want to download the documentation for local use on a single computer, choose the online or offline option above.

    Note: This DVD5 ISO image file doesn’t include updates to the documentation that were made after product release. See the online documentation for the latest information.

    If you have a network or environment that isn't connected to the internet (yep, day job has one...) and you need VS/.NET Doc's this is an ISO you'll need.

    It reminds me of the MSDN Library DVD days (which I think I still have a number of...lol)

    dotPeek introduces Process Explorer, decompile running .Net apps, in v1.2 EAP

    JetBrains .NET Tools Blog - dotPeek 1.2 EAP: Introducing Process Explorer

    "Have you ever wanted to dig deeper into a process running on your machine? We have. That’s the reason why the new dotPeek 1.2 EAP build introduces Process Explorer.

    The Process Explorer window provides you with the list of all currently running processes and allows decompiling those of them that are .NET processes. Once you locate a process to decompile, you can add it to Assembly Explorer for further investigation by clicking the “+” button. From there, you can export decompiled code to a Visual Studio project if necessary.

    image

    You can see native processes in this window as well although you naturally shouldn’t expect dotPeek to be able to decompile them. To display native processes, click Show Native Processes in the Process Explorer toolbar

    ...

    In case you’ve missed it, note that dotPeek 1.2 EAP can now work as a symbol server and supply Visual Studio debugger with the information required to debug assembly code. Download dotPeek 1.2 EAP and give it a try"

    That's scary cool...

    On an aside, I wonder if this isn't another reason to be interested in .Net Native Compile when releasing commercial apps? Native speed and a much harder time decompiling.... hum.

     

    Related Past Post XRef:
    "Hello dotPeek plugin" Creating a dotPeek plugin is New Project, NuGet easy...
    And there were three free RTW'd .Net Decompilers ... dotPeek v1 Released
    Another decompiler comes online - dotPeek from JetBrains

    Released.Free.Framework.MVVM.DevExpress

    DevExpress - Free DevExpress MVVM Framework released

    Previously, I mentioned our plans to offer a free version of the MVVM Framework. I am happy to announce the free DevExpress MVVM Framework is now available on NuGet and GitHub.

    image

    The free DevExpress MVVM Framework includes all the capabilities of the MVVM libraries installed with our components, except for those features specific to component integration. If you are using an up-to-date component installation, you already have full access to the MVVM Framework. Now, anyone can build an app with the DevExpress MVVM Framework or introduce our MVVM to an existing project – even when that project makes use of another framework.

    The major benefits of the DevExpress MVVM Framework are the independent parts in the framework, used separately or with other third-party MVVM libraries.

    • With POCO, get clear ViewModel code without unnecessary duplications. The POCO mechanism automatically generates bindable properties, commands, asynchronous commands, wrapper code for services, and much more.
    • EventToCommand support now includes converting event arguments, calling bound commands via Dispatcher, and processing attached events.
    • Finer visual customizations are available from the ViewModel using a set of predefined Services or custom Service.
    • Messenger takes the difficulty out of building loosely coupled app architectures.
    • Modify the behavior of any visual component. Simply create a Behavior and assign it with an Interaction.
    • Choose from a new set of converters useful for everyday scenarios.

    Easily find the free MVVM Framework on NuGet by searching “dx mvvm”. The free DevExpress MVVM Framework is distributed under the MIT License. Source code, testing libraries, and samples are available on GitHub. [GD: Post Leached In Full]

    DevExpress/DevExpress.Mvvm.Free

    imageimage

    DevExpress MVVM Framework is a set of components helping to work in the Model-View-ViewModel pattern in Silverlight and WPF.

    Documentation

    There are two versions of the DevExpress MVVM Framework:

    1. The version that is included to the DevExpress WPF/Silverlight component suite.

    2. The free version that is very similar to the first one. The only difference is that it does not contain some capabilities that are only needed when the framework is used with DevExpress components.

    Although DevExpress provides documentation for the first version only, you can use this documentation even if you use the free version. The documentation is available by the following link: https://documentation.devexpress.dev/#WPF/CustomDocument15112

    At the DevExpress site, you can find several training blog posts: https://community.devexpress.com/blogs/wpf/archive/2013/08/29/getting-started-with-devexpress-mvvm-framework-commands-and-view-models.aspx

    NuGet

    The Free DevExpress MVVM Framework is available from NugGet: https://www.nuget.org/packages/DevExpressMvvm/

    While I'm not sure we really need another MVVM framework, I do applaud DevExpress in releasing this and releasing it as open source. That and I'm glad to see a little WPF love. :)

    Tuesday, June 10, 2014

    C++ a little overkill for your next great Windows app? Check out AppStudio!

    developer.com - Beginner’s Guide to Using AppStudio for Building Windows 8 Applications

    Building applications isn’t easy, especially if you are not a developer and do not know how to. To help boost the number of apps on its ecosystem, Microsoft has provided a very way to build applications that can target Windows 8.1 and Windows Phone 8.1. In an earlier article (Speeding up Windows Phone Application Development Using App Studio) we saw how easy it was to create applications for Windows Phone 8 using AppStudio from Microsoft.

    At Build 2014, Microsoft announced Universal apps (apps built once that can run on multiple Windows devices). At the same time, AppStudio updated their tools to support building Universal Apps, which can run on both Windows Phone 8.1 as well as Windows 8.1

    In this article, we will explore how we can use AppStudio to easily build Windows 8.1 applications (which can also run on Windows Phone 8.1)

    Hands On

    To get started building applications using AppStudio, visit http://appstudio.windows.com/ and sign in.

    ...

    image

    Windows 8.1 and Windows Phone 8.1 packages

    At this stage, we have a few choices.

    1. Check out the application on our devices before we publish to the respective app stores.

    a. For this, we will need to install certificates (which are linked under the prerequisites section).

    b. Use the Installable packages to install the application on the device.

    2. We can also publish the application directly to the app stores. If we want to do that, we will have to associate our application publishing profile with AppStudio.

    3. We also can download the source code of the application, to add other features that are not provided by default.

    As we can see, application developer for Microsoft’s new ecosystem isn’t very hard when we use AppStudio. Happy building.

    Summary

    In this article, we saw how easy it was to create applications for Windows 8.1 and Windows Phone 8.1. I hope you have found the information useful.

    ...

    If you're looking to build a quick "information" app and don't need uber-power or performance that a native framework like Marmalade would provide, Free is always better with Marmalade... Marmalade SDK 7.3 for Windows now has a free edition, then something like the AppStudio might be just what you are looking for...

    Free is always better with Marmalade... Marmalade SDK 7.3 for Windows now has a free edition

    Building Apps for Windows - Marmalade SDK 7.3 for Windows platform: new features, free license

    Marmalade, a Windows platform middleware partner, just released a new version of their popular SDK.  The Marmalade SDK enables developers to deploy code across multiple platforms and devices from a single code base. The new 7.3 SDK release brings new capabilities for Windows 8 and 8.1 and Windows Phone 8 across all license types, including Community licenses.  And for new users, the SDK will be available for no license fee. Existing users with Indie, Plus or Pro licenses will get a free upgrade. 

    The addition of the Extension Development Kit for Windows Store (both Windows 8 and Windows 8.1 apps), enables developers to access Windows managed and native APIs, plus integration with advertising and social networks.

    The prior Marmalade SDK 7.2.1 release provided support for features such as Accelerometer, Audio, Compression, Video, and more. Just a few enhancements in this release include APIs to access:

    • Device camera UI and ability to capture frame data
    • Device’s magnetic compass reading
    • Facebook website via Facebook Connect
    • Get the full list here

    In addition, this release includes an ads-in-apps extension that support monetization through the Microsoft Advertising SDK or AdDuplex SDK.

    ...

    Made with Marmalade - Marmalade 7.3 is here. Get started...for free!

    Today we are excited to announce the release of Marmalade 7.3.

    Headlining this release we have:

    • Enhanced support for Windows Store platform 
    • Multi-touch support for Windows Desktop platform
    • OpenGL ES 3.0 support for iOS, Android and Windows Desktop platforms
    • OpenGL ES 2.0 and OpenAL 1.1 support for Marmalade Juice
    • GCC 4.8 support for building x86 and ARM application binaries
    • Hub support for simultaneous x86 and ARM deployment packaging on Android platform
    • iOS 7.1 framework support
    • ARM architecture variant support

    Over the next few days we will be going into a bit more detail on some of these so look out for further blog entries.

    Along with the new features above, we’ve squished a few pesky bugs and made a bunch of other smaller changes to improve your overall Marmalade experience.

    And the best news? Starting with the 7.3 release, Marmalade is now free for new users!

    ...

    Download It!

    image

    These guys are my Build Conference Buddies, and I've been giving them hell for years now about not having a all-the-time free version of their SDK. Since they now have one, I guess it's only fair to give them a shout-out.... :)

    [Humor] What a Developer says and what they are thinking...

    Found this via Jakub Chodounsk√Ĺ - Weekly Programming Digest #65

    image

    (http://i.imgur.com/M5wl14r.png)

    Tuesday, June 03, 2014

    My ASP.NET MVC, how you've rev'd...

    Shemeer's World of Programming - ASP.NET MVC Release History, Supported Visual Studio versions and .NET Framework

    ASP.NET MVC is a web application development framework built on top of Microsoft’s .NET Framework. ASP.NET MVC framework is a lightweight, highly testable presentation framework that is integrated with existing ASP.NET features.

    ...

    image

    You do you remember when Scott Gu wrote MVC a the plane (or so the story went)? Now look at it... Not sure if it's me, but the cadence still seems to be picking up...! Guess it's hear to stay... lol

    Not your usual Succinctly book... "Neural Networks using C# Succinctly" (reg-ware)

    James D. McCaffrey - Neural Networks using C# Succinctly

    I wrote a new book titled “Neural Networks using C# Succinctly”. It was published this week. There are many existing books on neural networks but no good ones (in my opinion) that focus on how to create neural networks from a software developer’s point of view. My book is free and you can download a PDF version from here:

    ...

    I’ve written books before but for “Neural Networks using C# Succinctly” the process was a bit different. I was sitting at my desk one day when I got an unsolicited phone call. Normally I never answer such calls but on this particular day, I did. The call was a young woman named Hilary Bowling who worked for a company called Syncfusion. Hilary asked me if I’d be interested in writing a book about neural networks.

    Hilary told me that Syncfusion published relatively short (roughly 100 page) e-books and made them available for free. I was skeptical — I figured there’d have to be a catch of some sort. But in fact, Syncfusion does publish free e-books for software developers. The only minor catch is that you have to register and end up on Syncfusion’s mailing list, but Syncfusion doesn’t take advantage of this (I signed up to see what would happen).

    Anyway, it took me a few months to write “Neural Networks using C# Succinctly” (writing a book is much more time-consuming than you might expect) and now it’s available from the Syncfusion Web site...

    Syncfusion - Neural Networks using C# Succinctly

    image

    Neural networks are an exciting field of software development used to calculate outputs from input data. While the idea seems simple enough, the implications of such networks are staggering—think optical character recognition, speech recognition, and regression analysis. With Neural Networks Using C# Succinctly by James McCaffrey, you'll learn how to create your own neural network to solve classification problems, or problems where the outcomes can only be one of several values. Learn about encoding and normalizing data, activation functions and how to choose the right one, and ultimately how to train a neural network to find weights and bias values that provide accurate predictions.

    Table of Contents

    1. Neural Networks
    2. Perceptrons
    3. Feed-Forward
    4. Back-Propagation
    5. Training

    How can you go wrong with 128 free('ish) pages on C# Neural Networks!

    image

     

    Related Past Post XRef:
    "Visual Studio 2013 Succinctly" free [reg-ware] now available from... you guessed it, Syncfusion
    "Windows Phone 8 Succinctly - The practical approach to Windows Phone 8 development" eBook (Reg-ware)
    Succinctly eBook of the Day: "Twitter Bootstrap Succinctly" [Reg-ware]
    Need some help up the WPF learning curve? "WPF Succinctly" from Syncfusion is now available (and free :)
    TypeScript Succinctly - Free [Name/email-ware] eBook
    Getting sharp with F# with the free "F# Succinctly" eBook [reg-ware]
    Syncfusion helps shed a little succinct light on LightSwitch with "LightSwitch Succinctly" (Reg-ware)
    "JavaScript Succinctly" - Another free (reg-ware) eBook from Syncfusion
    Get into sync with HTTP with the new free (reg-ware) Syncfusion Succinctly eBook, "HTTP Succinctly"
    Spelunk the technical details of the PDF format with "PDF Succinctly" from Syncfusion (Free/reg-ware PDF/Mobi ebook)
    "Git Succinctly" Free/reg-ware PDF/Mobi ebook)
    jQuery Succinctly - Free eBook (reg-ware, PDF and/or Mobi)